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ksmountain View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Topic: Best Boards for Beginners
    Posted: Jul/18/2010 at 6:07pm
In my review of snowboards, lately, I've been pushing the idea that park boards TEND (key word, TEND) to be the best beginner boards for purchase after someone has been on the mountain a couple times.

My reasoning is this--true beginner boards are outgrown really fast and once you outgrow them, you never want to use them. All-Mtn boards tend to be more aggressive, much harder to learn on, etc. You'd get longer value out an All-Mtn board, but that's irrelevant is you end up hating riding because your All-Mtn board is too stiff and catchy. Park boards are easy to turn, manuverable, etc. and when you want to move onto a serious All-Mtn board you still can use your park board as a park board.

This is the approach we used in purchasing my wife's board.

Then again, I'm not an instructor. Heck, on the hierarchy of snowboards, I'm probably about a 3 of out 10--I can ride, I can jump, I can spin some, I can park a little, but I'm light years from pro--double blacks still give me pause (but I'll do it).

So, other takes?
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/18/2010 at 6:36pm
Not sure what the question is but you kinda hit it on the head.
 
There are very few boards that i wouldnt recommend for a beginner.  Boards like the Custom X come to mind.  Otherwise you can pretty much learn on anything.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/18/2010 at 6:39pm
The problem with saying "park boards" is that covers a lot of different boards. Some of the boards would fit well for the reasons you said but there are the other park boards that are super soft and i would tell people to buy unless they know they want to ride park. 
I would say a med soft to med flex boards and a lot of park boards fit in there but other boards do too.
There are some people who are never going to really want a park board, so why buy one to learn on. 
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/19/2010 at 11:25am
I think for beginners you'd want a board that is soft, flexy, and not cambered. You want a board that is easy to turn, less likely to catch edges and light. These characteristics describe "park" boards more than any other type of board. So, yeah, ksmountain, I'd agree that park boards are probably the best type of board for a beginner.

I learned to ride on a Burton Social (a beginner board with all park-like characteristics, not sure if its meant for the park) and have now moved on to a Rome Blue, an all-mountain board. As I progressed I found the Social to be too slow and it couldn't handle powder well enough for me to continue with it. It's now my park board, should I ever venture over there.

Hope your wife had a good time on her park board.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/19/2010 at 11:33am
Originally posted by knoelle11

I think for beginners you'd want a board that is soft, flexy, and not cambered. You want a board that is easy to turn, less likely to catch edges and light. These characteristics describe "park" boards more than any other type of board. So, yeah, ksmountain, I'd agree that park boards are probably the best type of board for a beginner.

I learned to ride on a Burton Social (a beginner board with all park-like characteristics, not sure if its meant for the park) and have now moved on to a Rome Blue, an all-mountain board. As I progressed I found the Social to be too slow and it couldn't handle powder well enough for me to continue with it. It's now my park board, should I ever venture over there.

Hope your wife had a good time on her park board.

I disagree, I think everyone should learn on Camber....... r-camber develops bad habits.

So, I say any board thats cheap cambered and is the right size for you.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/19/2010 at 11:40am
Originally posted by ksmountain

In my review of snowboards, lately, I've been pushing the idea that park boards TEND (key word, TEND) to be the best beginner boards for purchase after someone has been on the mountain a couple times.

My reasoning is this--true beginner boards are outgrown really fast and once you outgrow them, you never want to use them. All-Mtn boards tend to be more aggressive, much harder to learn on, etc. You'd get longer value out an All-Mtn board, but that's irrelevant is you end up hating riding because your All-Mtn board is too stiff and catchy. Park boards are easy to turn, manuverable, etc. and when you want to move onto a serious All-Mtn board you still can use your park board as a park board.

This is the approach we used in purchasing my wife's board.

Then again, I'm not an instructor. Heck, on the hierarchy of snowboards, I'm probably about a 3 of out 10--I can ride, I can jump, I can spin some, I can park a little, but I'm light years from pro--double blacks still give me pause (but I'll do it).

So, other takes?


agree with this completely.  my first year of snowboarding i biught a burton clash.  not knockingthe board or anything, it was easy to learn on....but after about 6-7 days on the mountain i already started to feel like id outgrown it.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/19/2010 at 11:49am
I learned on a camber and even with experience on a camber, I couldn't just easily pick up on a reverse camber in an instant.  I think beginners should learn on a camber.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/19/2010 at 12:45pm
I think beginners should start on a zero camber board because they are easy to turn but still stable. I learned on a cambered board though and I still haven't switched to rocker. 
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/19/2010 at 12:55pm
Base might be another consideration.  I know that many prefer sintered to extruded, but an extruded base being slower might be better for beginners, since the speed can freak them out.  The additional maintenance required on a sintered board would also be a bit of a turn-off as well.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/20/2010 at 1:33pm
Telling beginners to learn on camber is a silly idea. It seems to be an idea stemmed from old school boarders who think new boarders should go through what they did first. "Back in my day...blah blah"

If they start on r-c and stick with r-c and its variations, why on earth does it matter if they start with r-c over camber?

And the 'bad habits' argument is hogwash, those 'habits' work for r-c so who decided they were 'bad habits'? Should we say learning camber gives you 'bad habits' for riding r-c? (No, I'm not saying that... I'm saying both statements are just as ridiculous)

Learn on whichever board allows the boarder to have fun. If your force someone to learn on camber and they end up having a really hard time and giving it up after one trip... was it really worth it? And if they prefer a camber to learn on, then thats great too.

My gf started on rentals(camber) and while she was progressing, she found it difficult. So I got her a v-spot this year to just let her have more fun and have an easier time. Fun...thats what we snowboard for right?

And I completely agree with the topic starter. A softer board (park) is a great start. After teaching a few people, turning is definitely the first big hurdle in learning and a softer board really helps in that. After they get the hang of it, let them decide on what their first "real" purchase should be.... all mountain, another park and camber or r-c, etc.

PS - I'm not saying one is better than the other for starting...its really preference (like choosing any gear in snowboarding). Camber or r-c though, I agree a softer board is the way to start imo. It makes learning (and teachingWink) a little easier, in my experiences anyway.

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/20/2010 at 1:38pm
Originally posted by rook

I think everyone should learn on Camber....... r-camber develops bad habits.
I agreed with rook..I know a Rev-Camber board will be more forgiving in the beginning, but I think it will hurt your learning curve later down the road.

Originally posted by Bugsbunnydad

Learn on whichever board allows the boarder to have fun. If your force someone to learn on camber and they end up having a really hard time and giving it up after one trip... was it really worth it? And if they prefer a camber to learn on, then thats great too.

My gf started on rentals(camber) and while she was progressing, she found it difficult. So I got her a v-spot this year to just let her have more fun and have an easier time. Fun...thats what we snowboard for right?

And I completely agree with the topic starter. A softer board (park) is a great start. After teaching a few people, turning is definitely the first big hurdle in learning and a softer board really helps in that. After they get the hang of it, let them decide on what their first "real" purchase should be.... all mountain, another park and camber or r-c, etc.
Who's forcing people to learn on camber?? Its whats out there and new riders shouldn't be buying stuff in the first place.

I've also taught/given advice to many new riders and most of them follow what I say(nothing forced), but a few stray and buy new decks thinking a softer one would be better. The fact of the matter is all the progression learnt on the rental(camber) boards goes out the window and they are starting over learning sloppy forum. I see it every year park-rats throwing down tricks, but do falling leafs down the rest of the slopes.

I say start on camber it might be a little harder and yes some people will turn away from boarding, but lets face it some people just can't hang so let them GO!!
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/20/2010 at 2:59pm

Are there significant differences between boards for males and females?

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/20/2010 at 3:22pm
Originally posted by J.Kwak



I say start on camber it might be a little harder and yes some people will turn away from boarding, but lets face it some people just can't hang so let them GO!!


I'll rather have my friends and girlfriend enjoy it from the getgo. And anyone who has wanted a gf to get into boarding knows "letting them go" isn't an option...unless you're one of the luckier ones whose gf doesn't mind you leaving for a bunch of weekends every year. Definitely not an option for me with mine being the fiance. Having a gf that enjoys boarding like you makes life 10000x easier...also makes yearly $500+ purchases a lot easier to explain.

Once you enjoy something, its much easier to teach someone the more advanced skills. But if you start something frustrated, it makes teaching that much more difficult.... And this isn't just for snowboarding, I'm a teacher in real life (not boarding, at a school) and that's the way I teach. Confidence first, skills second is how I was taught to teach. And it is extremely surprising how EASY it is to make a student feel confident in something...IF you start at the beginning. Instilling confidence in a student in the middle is a lot tougher once they've already lost that confidence. This is one fact that does not change whether you're 8 years old or 40 years old and... errrr sorry teacher rant, back to boarding.

Even if you learned on a r-c, once you've progressed to beyond a beginner, learning how to adjust to a camber isn't going to take more than a long trip so I don't understand how it stunts your learning curve. I'm sure most people would agree going from never snowboarding to snowboarding is harder than a snowboarder going from a r-c to a camber or vice versa. This is my opinion on this topic> For a casual boarder with no "going pro" inclinations, just learn on what's easier whether that be stiff/med/soft, rc/camber/hybrid, all mountain/park/a piece of plywood blah blah
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/20/2010 at 6:34pm
Originally posted by Marumm

Base might be another consideration.  I know that many prefer sintered to extruded, but an extruded base being slower might be better for beginners, since the speed can freak them out.  The additional maintenance required on a sintered board would also be a bit of a turn-off as well.
I don't really think a beginner is gonna notice much of a difference between bases but for a beginner board extruded is better because it is cheaper and doesn't need much waxing.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/20/2010 at 6:42pm
'll rather have my friends and girlfriend enjoy it from the getgo. And anyone who has wanted a gf to get into boarding knows "letting them go" isn't an option...unless you're one of the luckier ones whose gf doesn't mind you leaving for a bunch of weekends every year. Definitely not an option for me with mine being the fiance. Having a gf that enjoys boarding like you makes life 10000x easier...also makes yearly $500+ purchases a lot easier to explain...Once you enjoy something, its much easier to teach someone the more advanced skills. But if you start something frustrated, it makes teaching that much more difficult.... And this isn't just for snowboarding, I'm a teacher in real life (not boarding, at a school) and that's the way I teach.

This.

Great post. Helping my spouse learn to love snowboard has been awesome. I always loved it and fell in love with again working my wife and now its something literally my whole family enjoys (4 year old included). "Letting them go" was not an option...and they're turning out pretty decent.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/20/2010 at 7:34pm
My opinion on the whole board for begginner is: it really doesnt matter. This is why, since the person is going to be going into a new sport, does it matter what board they are on, as the sport is completely new. Every board can be different for everyone. So it might be best to try on diff ones when you first started. I started out on a camber board, and hated it after trying my friend reverse camber.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/20/2010 at 8:06pm
RENT RENT RENT RENT RENT

but if you REALLY want to buy a board.. i'd say a park-ish board, something softer.. used is a great option (i have a burton blunt 155 for sale if anyone would like one.. LOL) but i really wouldn't recommend buying a brand new board unless you have that much extra money lying around
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/20/2010 at 8:11pm
i think for a beginner an all mountain board would be the best option
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/20/2010 at 8:12pm
This is a good thread, hopefully more people reply to the original poster and describe more beginner boards. Sometimes renting isn't the best option, take me for example. I'm heading to Japan for 6 weeks and planning on hitting the slopes for at least three weeks. Hiring a board for those three weeks work out to be the same (if not more) price as buying one
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/20/2010 at 8:43pm
I rode a few times in rental boards in Feb (my first times) and then bought a Burton Custom V Rocker when Sierra had their sale in March. I was able to ride 3 more times on it. I was very happy with it being a beginner and I feel that it will last me for a while. I was even playing around a little in the park with it!

In my opinion, I think an all mt. board is best for beginner and then they can move on to a new all mt. board or a park board. Stick around in the chat and seek other opinions.

Great thread!
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/20/2010 at 9:00pm
id recommend an all mountain board for the first few years... then buy a board depending on what you like more, powder riding, or park riding
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/21/2010 at 1:51am
Originally posted by bwen

This is a good thread, hopefully more people reply to the original poster and describe more beginner boards. Sometimes renting isn't the best option, take me for example. I'm heading to Japan for 6 weeks and planning on hitting the slopes for at least three weeks. Hiring a board for those three weeks work out to be the same (if not more) price as buying one


Cool welcome to Japan! Rental prices are pretty brutal in Japan...unless you came on a package deal with a hotel. With those package deals, renting is extremely cheap... like 1000 yen(~$10USD) a day. But even at 10 bucks a day...3 weeks is like 210 bucks which could get you a pretty decent board in this time of year.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/21/2010 at 2:02am
I would get an all mountain board. Some good boards which I have tried like the Sierra Crew and the Nitro Swindle.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/21/2010 at 4:20am
I found that a more flexible, forgiving board was best while learning. I have the Sierra Team as a beginner board that I now use in the park, so if I were a beginner I would go with a park board.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/21/2010 at 4:23am
Normally I would say this would be a hard question, but the sierra collabs are still in stock, and are great boards for the money. Pick up a crew (all mountain pretty standard kind of board) or a stunt (if you plan on riding in the park alot).
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/21/2010 at 7:09am
Originally posted by Peekaboo

My opinion on the whole board for begginner is: it really doesnt matter. This is why, since the person is going to be going into a new sport, does it matter what board they are on, as the sport is completely new. Every board can be different for everyone. So it might be best to try on diff ones when you first started. I started out on a camber board, and hated it after trying my friend reverse camber.


Have to disagree with you, Peekaboo. Equipment choice matters a lot. I think the bolded text above in your message explains why. When new people start in a sport, what they use matters because you want equipment that makes learning as easy as possible. Camber boards, in general, making learning HARDER. I learned on a camber board, let's be clear, because there were no reverse camber boards. In fact, I learned on a 166 when I was 5'9" and 150lbs! Now, riding that beast taught me a lot BUT if I hadn't had massive peer pressure from the other 14 year old dudes to be cool, I probably would have quit after snapping down on my face for the 50th time.

I don't think the "learn right or quit" attitude is very appealling to beginners and seems to indicate that the teacher doesn't have the enjoyment of the student entirely in mind. Besides, as bugs pointed out, what is the "right way" for a cambered rider might not be the "right way" for a reverse camber rider! It's all relative and the true test is "what works"! The test of "what works" is what gets the rider stoked not what the instructor thinks is "proper."

I really like bugsbunny's post above because it involves a teaching philosophy--an approach that focuses on confidence and fun before technical skills. Once a person is hooked, you can work on skills.

Every person is different and different boards work for different people. But the goal of the thread is to help folks pick a board when they DON'T know what they prefer. And I--and some other folks (including you, Peekaboo)--think that beginners should, when in doubt, get a nice, soft, reverse cambered board. It makes learning the easiest and the most fun.

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/21/2010 at 7:48am
I'm no expert but here's my 2 cents.
I think beginners should learn on cambered boards. The reason being is that they learn the correct fundamentals of snowboarding. Whereas you can get away with some things on a reverse cambered board, the cambered board isn't as forgiving. This might sound counter-intuitive but i'd rather learn the correct way of doing things.
Would you rather do something right or do something quick?

I started out on cambered boards when i was first learning and yes there was a lot of falling, a lot of big wipeouts but it didn't make me love snowboarding any less. With most things, there are gonna be difficulties starting out and if that turns you off from snowboarding then so be it. It seems everyone wants instant gratification and they want to take the easiest way there. But you know the old saying, anything worth doing is worth doing right. Wait... is that an old saying? is that the saying i'm thinking about... i'm not sure anymore...

Last year i finally switched up from a cambered board... kind of... i bought a dual cambered board (c2btx)... and it is harder to catch an edge but at the same time it makes me kind of lazy... and the last thing you wanna be when bombing down a mountain.. is lazy..
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/21/2010 at 10:31am
I may be speaking for myself, but being able to test numerous boards before I decide on one isn't an option.  


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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/21/2010 at 6:19pm
i would sugest any of the customs expecialy the custom v rocker or the burton blunt if you search for good boards for beginners or freestyle beginner boards your going to find some amazing boards
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/21/2010 at 9:47pm
I believe everyone should start on rentals or durable boards. Beyond that, it's def situational. Teaching a SO? Make it easy. Teaching a buddy? Get them to do it right. I feel like doing it right from the get-go saves people later frustration when they have to "unlearn" what they've been doing.

In effect you either front-load the frustration or set it back a ways into the learning curve. For a buddy who's already pumped to learn, definitely a good idea to get them to learn it right.

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/21/2010 at 9:55pm
burton ltr boards are pretty durable.. cheap too
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/22/2010 at 7:31am
I went for the Sierra Crew (152), it had great reviews and at $149.99 I couldn't pass it up.  It may not be the best beginner board but it's a game of trial and error.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/22/2010 at 7:47am
All the falling, faceplants, and wipeouts I took learning on a cambered board made the satisfaction so great when I could finally get down the slope without eating it. I learned on a cambered board; it was stiff and too large for me, but I wanted in on this sport so I went with it. Equipment matters, but someone who really wants to be a part of something will do whatever they can to make it happen.  Although this threads topic is beginner boards, I have to say nothing frustrates me on the hill like a set of horrible bindings (and ive had my fair share of those lol) when your feet hardly fit in and the ratchets get stuck an you gotta take your gloves off to feed the strap in and unjam the ratchet while its snowing, kinda kills the vibe.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/22/2010 at 1:16pm
At the prices Sierra sells most of their bindings, you'd be doing an injustice by not purchasing higher end.  Go big or go home!!
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/23/2010 at 7:15am
don't think there is a "best board".

Find something you are willing to pay for and that is a good size and specs for what you want to do and go with that. No point buying a beginner board and then getting past it before you are even used to it. Just read reviews and know what you want, and stick to your budget i say
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/24/2010 at 12:43am
Not trying to restart the argument or anything but I saw this post from snowolf over at snowboarding-forum. He's always very informative and I enjoy his posts. Here's what he said when someone asked about beginners starting on R-C


RC boards are good boards for beginners to learn on in my opinion. The first few days of riding for most people can be hell from falling. Many people never get over it and never get past this stage which is too bad. Anything that makes these first few days of riding less painful for folks is a good thing.

Now, it is true that without proper instruction, bad habits can develop and the forgiving nature of an RC can reinforce these bad habits. Then, when a person does try a cambered board, it kicks their ass. Personally, I think a person should get on a standard cambered board early on after that initial learning phase in order to improve their edge awareness.


Pretty good advice if you ask me.

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/24/2010 at 1:10am
I would say get your protective gear all sorted.

Not alot of people give warnings to how easily you can injure yourself while snowboarding.

I suggest a helmet, wrist guards at least. My brother got knee pads and a butt crash pad also which made it quicker for him to get confident without worrying about hurting himself too much and picked up snowboarding quicker imo.

Also watching the videos on how to snowboard before going there would help also.

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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/24/2010 at 3:06am
Originally posted by PowderMonkey

I think beginners should start on a zero camber board because they are easy to turn but still stable. I learned on a cambered board though and I still haven't switched to rocker. 


Totally agree with this - I started on a zero camber too and I found it really comfortable. Sometimes I still use it from time to time; I've had a lot of fond memories with that board.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/24/2010 at 3:43am
Originally posted by Malnol


Originally posted by PowderMonkey

I think beginners should start on a zero camber board because they are easy to turn but still stable. I learned on a cambered board though and I still haven't switched to rocker. 
Totally agree with this - I started on a zero camber too and I found it really comfortable. Sometimes I still use it from time to time; I've had a lot of fond memories with that board.


Also learnt on camber and currently have the crew, although i would like to try the v rockers to see what they are like..
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/24/2010 at 3:48am
A zero camber is a good choice. I would get something pretty soft and flexi. Beginners have a lot of problems learning on stiff boards. 
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/24/2010 at 3:55am
if u get a park though, because its excruded/cambered making the contact point differently and harder to turn. true its easier to spin, but turning isn't its speciality. l rather get a cheap beginner/advance board
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/24/2010 at 4:36am
get on whatever board you like. But get some lessons if you can. I didnt. And its pretty sucky seeing people linking turns just as they hit their first afternoon, when it took you three days and a LOT of falling (and a very sore tail bone). :)

You can learn bad habits on camber and reverse camber depending on what you learn to ride after, the fact is this though: if you learn to ride a freeride deck you will learn a whole heap about your edges and youll hate almost every minute of it though :) But man oh man, youll be fearless on a carve once you get it sussed!

So from day 1, i recommend you get on a freeride because youll have the tightest riding ability youll ever get!

Only kidding. Balance it out. If youve learned a bit already you can literally get on any deck, but the big battle at the start is keeping you motivated and getting you to step up, so the best board for that is the following:

Soft medium flex. (4-5)
The right size for your weight.
and er, camber :)

Im not afraid of recommending reverse camber, i do it all the time, but the fact is your edge feels a lot stronger and (more to the point) consistent compared to reverse camber. getting bounced on bobbles when youre making a turn adds just one more thing you dont want to have to deal with while youre learning. You want that turn locking in by getting those contacts on the snow.

But its not an exclusive thing. Its not like youre going to learn nothing on reverse camber, it just means some things (particularly the step from linking turns to carving but turns in general), are going to feel a little more squirly than on camber. Just a little more. But then, other things (riding pow, playing in teh park, doing little ground tricks, landing baby jumps, etc) are all going to feel a little easier on Reverse. But not exclusively easy :) And thats the important point. Some things in the beginning stage are going to feel more natural on camber, and others on reverse camber. No matter what though, its not like youre just not going to learn how to ride on camber/reverse camber.

At the early stages its honestly more about learning to shift your weight than it is about what board youre riding. Once you master the weight shift, youre free to get on whatever the hell board you like. :) before that, youll still learn everything you need to progress on whatever dieck youd like, but i just think youre less at the mercy of the terrain on a camber deck.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/24/2010 at 6:15am
i started with the sierra RC, by the end of the first day i was linking turns, found it pretty easy to hold an edge through the icy conditions and such. obviously i havent ridden a camber board or a zero camber board but i <3 mine

on the 2nd last day we got like 20cm of powder and the RC was amazing, i was having much less trouble than my mates on cambered boards. the RC gets my 7 thumbs up
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/24/2010 at 7:38am
I started out boarding three seasons ago.  I bought a burton balance 157.5 off my friend with good bindings and boots for a steal.  I knew nothing about snowboard sizing or the difference between beginner/advanced boards etc. (for those of you who don't know the balance is a super stiff camber pipe board not for beginners). 

I am friends with a few of the ski/snowboard instructors at our local hill (and it is a HILL) so I got all the proper tips and instruction one needs while starting out. except that a 157.5 is pretty small for a guy who is 6' 4" and 215. This fact coupled with the ridiculous torsional stiffness of the balance naturally let to my butt's absolute destruction! 

So of course after that beating i naturally fell in love with the sport (lol). 

Back to the drawing board, i found this website and quickly became educated on proper snowboards for beginners. I picked the burton bullet 164. Definitely on the long and wide end of the spectrum but it had a super price and was recommended for beginning.  

Next time out the whole world seemed to change! I could pretty much do anything i wanted on the board. Well, except carving hard and ollies. 

now i can go back to that balance and just fly with that sucker! I also have a new joystick  161 and it's just amazing. (btw i'm totally not a burton fanboy i just got good deals) 

So i guess in my opinion i have to say that the softer boards are the best thing for beginners.  But not just a soft board b/c a beginner would have a much tougher time on my joystick than say a hero.  It's the torsional rigidity that really makes the difference for beginners.  being able to get that front edge going and just letting the back follow. 

But in all honesty I have no need for my gigantor bullet anymore. i actually used it for sledding last year haha. 
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/30/2010 at 2:55am
For Aussie snow: Mid-range stiffness/flex, not too wide for your stance (I'm 5'5" + stocky), and definitely not a too-long park board while you're a beginner.

I've just ordered a Sierra Stunt as it suits the type of style I enjoy most after spending most of my seasons on mid-range all mountain and freestyle boards. Not interested in speed all that much (got bored), but like to have fun doing stuff. Always have.

I'd like to have a second board for speed on our very average wet 'snow', but it's not my first choice for purchase.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/10/2010 at 6:24am
i started out with a stiff board and it was great for learning. however once i started to get better I had to buy a more flexible board
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/10/2010 at 1:50pm
I think instead of buying a lower end snowboard, beginners should look at picking up a used, well priced, intermediate board. My first board was a Burton Custom. Which may sound strange but i got it brand new for $90! The guy never used it.
In my opinion, it is better to pay the same amount for a used board that is from a well known company, than paying more or the same for a board that you will be holding you back in a year.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/10/2010 at 1:58pm
used boards are awesome for beginners, cheap, and way better than renting
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