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Topic ClosedAny Split Boarders Out There-

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cyrus10101 View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Topic: Any Split Boarders Out There-
    Posted: Apr/06/2011 at 7:52pm
I have never done it, but it sounds like kind of a fun/crazy thing to do if you know what you are doing. Just wondering if anybody out there who has experience with experience with this has some knowledge to share...
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Skio25 View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/06/2011 at 8:20pm
I would make your own with a kit if you can instead of buying a pre-made they seem to be realll expensive. I'm hoping to split an old board next season, It's still going to run at least $570 for the parts with r&d bindings, plus the board, also poles and anything else or crampons but I don't think I'll need them.
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spenser View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/06/2011 at 8:27pm
next year:

jones hovercraft split 56
2012 spark blaze LT binders

we'll see how it goes...
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shwazy View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/06/2011 at 8:35pm
I am contemplating the set up...I have four buddies who all dove in this year.  One of them moved to Tahoe recently so there should be ample opportunities...hard to throw down that kind of coin though without knowing how many days I will get in though.
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ippollite View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/06/2011 at 9:38pm
im definitely mentally down for it. I was about 20,000 yen (about $230) away from getting my charlie split and ready (30k for split, 20k for skins and 20k for voile kit). I maybe should have done it... its only money, but it just seemed too much considering i already owned it. If i end up living in japan again after summer ill probably end up doing it. Truth is though its one of those things that i wonder if i really should just because a) my ability isnt honestly high enough to warrant a split, and b) i just dont have the kind of friends that WANT to leave the piste behind and hike up a mountain for some fresh turns.

I wonder if doing it would end up a massive mistake since i get this pair of pseudo skis at not only a huge outlay, but end up with a potentially less rigid board as a consequence (as well as having to deal with those pesky skins).

So er, put me in the "might do" camp :)
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killclimbz View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/07/2011 at 3:51am
You might say I have a little experience (it's all I do) splitboarding. 

I recommend factory splits.  You can often find good deals on Voile splits this time of year.  You can certainly get away with a DIY job.

As far as the ride goes, I really can't tell much of a difference between a split or a solid on the down.  The main thing is weight.  A split will weigh more because of the interface.  The amount of difference is not nearly what it was 10 years ago.  Spark bindings, Karakorum, and lighter boards are making up the gap.  It's a couple of pounds at most these days.  For any rider worth their salt, it'll take a run or two to get used to it.


Not having to carry a board on your back is the huge advantage.  Hike in high winds or thick trees with a board on your back and you'll know why.

As far as for what you need after you have split with skins.  Poles are must of course.  Black Diamond 3 section Expedition poles are the best and also some of the more affordable.  Don't mess with anything that is two section or twist lock.  Flick Locks are the only thing that works reliably in the field.  Trust me on this one.  Also, extend your poles all the way after you get home to dry out the sections.  Or else they'll oxidize and get stuck together.  Yeah, I learned that bitch.

A good solid pack to carry water, food, skins, emergency gear, and your board (It's necessary from time to time) is also key.

Finally, and this stuff you can not go without.  You need an avalanche beacon, shovel, and probe.  Learn how to use that stuff.  You also need to either hook up with people who know how to travel safely in avalanche terrain and are willing to take you under their wing.  And/or you need to take an avalanche course.  An avalanche I course is highly recommended, but a basic avy awareness course will do worlds for you.  Read some books, Staying Alive in Avalanche Terrain by Bruce Tremper is a great read and you'll learn a lot. 

Splitboarding is freakin' fantastic, but it's also very hard work.  Backcountry riding is amazing, you do stuff people pay for snowcats and Helicopters to take them on, for free.  It's also truly "Wild snow".  You make one bad decision and you'll be taken out of the game of life in a nanosecond.  There is no ski patrol to come rescue your carcass.  If you and your buds are not prepared, you, your partner, or everyone in your group are dead. 

The thing is it's pretty easy to stay out of trouble, and most of the time your are rewarded for your hard work with conditions way better than a resort ever offers.  It's game on over 90% of the time you go out.  Like December 18th this season when the resorts were marginally open and going off of groomers was not much of an option.








All done by splitting.
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zakk View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/07/2011 at 4:02am
I have all the safety stuff, was going to start with just snowshoes to do the n00b hills around tahoe.

 Staying Alive in Avalanche Terrain is a heavy book.  I'm taking my time and really go through it but there is a ton of information.  I'm threatening to take an Intro course next weekend, then go for AIARE I next season early. 

No one  I know does BC, so finding some peeps to roll with/learn from is seemingly the hard part.  all my friends get mad when I just want to hike something in-bounds...

edit: and Killclimbz is one of the best "sharers" of BC knowledge i've seen around.  The cat knows what he's doing and is kind enuff to share.  Listen to him. 
-zakk

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ippollite View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/07/2011 at 4:14am
he is though isnt he. Its posts like that which really reminds me that its a total joke that someone like me has the 'expert member' tag. As for the avi course... i dont feel even remotely confident in truth to deal with things like that on my own after doing it. Id definitely need some people to guide me through it. I feel like i have some kind of understanding, but nowhere near enough experience to apply it. Still, one day ill drop one of his bus size (controlled) cornice bombs and cry happy tears as it triggers a slide. :)
m00m
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cyrus10101 View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/07/2011 at 4:15am
Great pics killclimbz! I've always been a little curious when I see folks on the side of the road getting their splitboards / touring skis ready as I drive up to the resorts :) (You see a lot of them in UT).

It sounds like a really great way the best way to get out into the back country if you are a boarder. (i.e. way better than snow shoes). But you definitely have to be safe about it...
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killclimbz View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/07/2011 at 4:22am
http://splitboard.com/talk/index.php guys.  This is a great site to pick up some partners.  There are certainly a ton of peeps in Tahoe on that board.  There are also tons of peeps from around the world.  At the very least someone there will probably point you in the right direction. 

Also, it's hard to gain experience without going at there and experiencing it.  So you have to get into the field and therein lies the bitch of the problem.  So you got to start safe and small and figure out how it works in your local spots.  The stuff I do now at Berthoud Pass is completely different than the stuff I did there when I first got into this over 10 years ago.  Knowing your terrain is a big part of the experience.  Learning where the most dangerous slide spots are, terrain traps, and safe(r) spots are comes with getting out there. 

And yeah, dropping huge cornice bombs is really fun. Big smile




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killclimbz View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/07/2011 at 5:09am
Originally posted by cyrus10101

But you definitely have to be safe about it...


Thanks man.

I had to quote that last little bit there.  BC riding is so much damn fun, but you just can't stress that line enough.  A snowboarder was killed on Berthoud Pass on MLK day.  I was up there, and it was pretty obvious that it was a dangerous day and you had to choose your lines wisely.  This guy made a few simple mistakes that ended his and his dog's life. 

Number one was that neither him or his buddy were carrying avalanche gear.  Second, they traveled out onto a slope that is know for sliding.  Other mistakes of course.  The sad part is that Jeffery's head was located less than 18" under the snow.  I talked to one of the lead guys on S&R that was there during the recovery.  He described the avalanche as "very survivable".  This one just keeps on ripping my guts out as if we had of been alerted that there was a possible victim, we had a shot at setting up a probe line that just maybe could have saved him.  It would have been a long shot, but you have no shot being dug out 3 days later...
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dougfagel View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/07/2011 at 6:11am
For the DIY Voile Split Kit you should have some skills with finished carpentry to really do it well. 

With that said any one can do it and have a board that will work out in the backcountry.

The biggest down fall is the lack of a metal edge on each side of your skis when touring. This is only an issue when you are on ice or hard-pack in exposed areas. The crampon attachments will also work to get more grip in these situations. But when the surface is too hard for the crampon to cut in it makes for pretty hard trekking.

The biggest upgrade you can make to your split setup, whether it is a DIY Kit or a manufactured Split Board, is Spark R&D Bindings. These really are key to get a true board feel and to cut weight back down to what you would expect on a normal board.



The other upgrade I recommend is getting the Karakoram Clips to replace your Voile Hooks. These are currently sold out but will be in stock direct from Karakoram this fall, 2011.



When buying VoileSpark R&D and Karakoram I recommend buying direct from the manufacturer. 

Split Boarding Tip: It is always handy to have a piece of skin wax on hand while in the Backcountry in case you hit some wet snow to avoid your skins from sticking as you are trekking.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/07/2011 at 6:39am
I have never split-boarded before, but I suggest snowshoeing in the backcountry a few times before you drop the money on a split, just to see if you even like the idea of backcountry riding and are willing to put in the time and effort.
 
You could probably get a split on Craigslist for around $500, sometimes the seller will include skins and all the accessories.  Have fun, be safe, and check http://sierraavalanchecenter.org/ before you head out!  (Of course that site only applies to those in the greater Tahoe area)
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killclimbz View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/07/2011 at 7:00am
http://www.avalanche.org/ is a great portal that has links to all avalanche centers in North America.  You should check your local avalanche center before going out.  It should also be checked on a daily basis so that you will have an idea as to what is going on with your local snow pack.  Information overload is a big part of the game.  
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/07/2011 at 7:19am
Originally posted by robnezz23


You could probably get a split on Craigslist for around $500, sometimes the seller will include skins and all the accessories.


Isnt DIY binding plate placement sort of permanent, other than redrilling and trying to adjust it without overlapping any of the other inserts? If so I'd keep that in mind and check it out before dropping even that much on it.
If they included skins and the whole shebang that would be an awesome deal especially if you mean a factory made one, the skins are real expensive -- how long do they last?
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| | | bryman | | | View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/07/2011 at 7:31am
I've been riding the split for a couple years now, generally got into the BC on snowshoes prior to that.  It's fantastic
 
As for sales, I picked up a new Venture split for my wife at Mammoth Mountaineering (it's the storm 152/24ww, serious board and should be perfect for her) a couple weekends back at ~$300 off, it's the best deal I've seen on something that will fit her and I've been looking for a WHILE.  Your best bet looking for a sale splitter is going to be personally, in shops like that.  there isn't much available on the internet right now, at least in the sizes I was checking out for her
 
I kitted her out with my old SparkR&D fuzes so I could upgrade to Blazes (I wanted to go from medium to Large) so throw in another $300 (Mammoth gave me 10% off -- thanks!) there
 
By the time you throw in the voile puck kit and skins, there's another $300
 
So total of $1200.00 or thereabouts.  But it is a really, really nice set up that she'll be riding for a long time
 
But there are a couple upgrades I need to get as well . . . she'll need a pair of crampons (actually I'll need a new pair since I'm giving her my old ones) and the LT pin system looks intriguing as well -- guess I'll need to add another $300 for that stuff!
 
As far as the DIY kits, don't do it.  Suck it up and spend a couple extra $$ to get a factory split, it's going to last a long time and be much more solid riding.  Especially with the Ventures the factory splitters are well put togehter and will ride more like a "real" board than something your a$$hole brother hacksawed and drilled !!!
 
-b
 
P.S.  fagel I hadn't seen those Karakoram clips, that's a great idea and I'll be buying some of those asap
get bent
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/07/2011 at 7:45am
Originally posted by dougfagel

For the DIY Voile Split Kit you should have some skills with finished carpentry to really do it well. 

With that said any one can do it and have a board that will work out in the backcountry.
 
This guy made a few really good videos on how to DIY with the Voile split kit.  Yes, it looks very hard for someone who has never done any carpentry work before.
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/15/2011 at 10:54am
Didn't get a chance to try splitboarding yet this season, and time is quickly running out.  I need to get on it!
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| | | bryman | | | View Drop Down
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Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/15/2011 at 11:03am
^^^  Rob there's a shop in Truckee called The Backcountry where you can rent a full-on split setup for (I think) $50 or so for the entire weekend.  Give them a call and get that hook-up.  They're renting high-quality boards (priors) and the shop is staffed by the most knowledgeable people in the area including the guy  that owns it mike.  Google "The Backcountry" and you'll get there
 
Should be a great, safe weekend to get out, too
 
-b
get bent
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