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The Women's Snowboard Buying Guide (supplement)

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  Quote ippollite Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: The Women's Snowboard Buying Guide (supplement)
    Posted: Apr/30/2011 at 1:21am
THE WOMEN'S SUPPLEMENTAL SNOWBOARD BUYING GUIDE

Contents:
Step 1: Why do you even need a women's board?
Step 2: The Different Kinds of Board
Step 3: Conclusion and Board List

Understanding and using the supplement:



I'm a guy. I don't work in a shop. I've only been riding for 4 years. And in those four years, I've probably ridden, at most around 8 decks. Unsurprisingly, none of them have been women's decks.

In summary: I am no expert, don't take me for one. Realistically, how much information can I give a woman asking about her gear?

You might think "not a lot, ipps!" and you'd be quite right. I can't tell you how a board 'feels', nor can i tell you how it flexes or where its sweet spot is. That is something YOU are unfortunately burdened with finding out for yourself.

Instead, much like the intentions of the original guide, the aim is to give you a general idea about women's snowboards, throw out some recommendations, explain some things about the tech, and then send you off on your merry way.

This guide won't answer all your questions about board (x), indeed it will barely scratch the surface. But that isn't really the function. The aim of this guide instead is to start you off on your own little mission.

In addition it should be mentioned that this is a supplement to the main guide. So I'm afraid I won't be going over the things from the main guide: for example I won't be explaining the differences in cambers, or what an extruded base is, or how directional boards work. So if you are hoping that this is self contained, I'm afraid you might find this a bit overwhelming.

The aim of this guide isn't to tell you what everything is, (that was the aim of the other guide). The aim instead is to simply cover some of the glaring oversights, omissions, and assumptions I made in that guide pertaining to womens issues when buying a snowboard.

About this Guide:

Which of course leads me to the question: Is there even such a thing as a women's snowboard? Aren't all snowboards the same and aren't we just being sold a cosmetic repackaging of a mans snowboard just in a smaller size wand with 'girlier' graphics?

The answer is No. (qualified).

In Part 1: I will outline the two central reasons why women's snowboards even exist and why you should probably be buying them instead of a man's snowboard if given the choice. I will then add a third reason which has nothing at all to do with the ride you are looking at, and everything to do with assumptions in the industry.

In part 2: I will break down women's snowboards into three principal categories: Boards that work well in park; Boards that work well for the whole resort; and boards that are more for all terrain/conditions inside and outside the resort. In effect I've smashed categories 1 and 2 from the earlier guide together, as well as categories 4, 5 and 6.

Finally part 3 will offer a table of all the boards I decided to research. Want to know which boards have a sintered base? or a directional cut? Or are hybrid cambered? I've got your back.

The intention is to try and offer women something comprehensive to make up for the general lack of information out there :) Buying a snowboard is a pain in the ass. Manufacturers don't help (with the possible exception of Burton and Rome). Almost every major snowboarding site or review site focuses almost all of their attention towards male snowboarding and male snowboarders. Compared to men's snowboards (which often have peer reviews a mere google search away), researching women's snowboards often leads to sites simply repeating the company blurb.

The table in part three puts all the information in one place and standardizes the language so that you can see for yourself what kind of boards have the camber profile/shape/base you're interested in, (or the price point you're looking at (all MSRP, and hopefully correct)). This way you can also get a sense of some other boards that might fit a similar function or criteria to help you out with your own research.

In this instance, the supplement goes way beyond the mens guide specifically with the intention of correcting a little of the imbalance of access to information out there.
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  Quote ippollite Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/30/2011 at 1:21am
STEP 1: WHY YOU SHOULD PROBABLY BUY A WOMAN'S BOARD



With the obvious exceptions of maybe Roxy and Bitchboards, you will be hard pressed to find a company that has as much diversity in their women’s line than their men’s. Obviously the bigger brands like Burton or Rome might have several women specific boards, but compared to their men’s range, women still have fewer options available to them. This may be due to an economic reality that fewer girls snowboard, or buy snowboards. It might even be due to a simple failure of imagination on the part of manufacturers to encourage female riders by actually marketing towards them (making it a long-standing oversight that’s only recently being corrected).


Whatever it is, it’s well beyond the scope of this supplement but it can lead to an interesting quandary for any average sized woman out there in that 146-156 size range feeling like her options might be limited.

And it is this:

if my recommended size is 146-156, why shouldn’t I just get on a man’s board and double or even triple my options out there?

There are 2 technology related reasons who you wouldn’t want to. The first of these is differences in strength between men and women relating to the pressure required to flex and move a board. The second reason, and arguably the most important is about foot size vis a vis a boards width at the binding point. Simply, women’s boards are narrower and smaller than men’s boards with a softer flex pattern (comparatively speaking).

There is however a third reason, which I’m slightly reluctant to put up simply because it feels like its bringing in politics to what is supposed to be a board guide. It also feels like it adds a burden of responsibility onto female shredders that men just don’t have to face. So I qualify it with this: this one has nothing at all to do with your riding. So feel free to consign it to the same place as eco friendly snowboarding. If it matters to you, then it matters. If not, it doesn’t.

A quick note about the phrase: "Comparatively speaking."

Just like men's boards, women's boards come in all flexes, all cambers, all shapes, and all sizes. I could make the statement that womens boards are universally softer than mens boards, but this is of course utterly incorrect. Hows about the signal park rocker versus the Burton Fortress? They are however COMPARATIVELY softer. And that context is set by the fact that many women's boards are built along the lines of (and derived from) a male counterpart board. The second sex snowboard if you will :)

GET YOUR DAMN HANDS OFF MY STUFF!!!



Reason 1: Women are ON AVERAGE lighter then men. Women's boards are therefore COMPARATIVELY softer than men's boards

Firstly women’s boards have a different longitudinal and torsional flex from men’s boards. Board makers reason that since women (on average) are lighter, and have less muscle mass, even if they narrowed the waist width, the average woman would still have trouble flexing or loading a burton custom. It would effectively ride as a much stiffer board (taking it out of the realms of an all mountain do it all board, and making it feel more akin to their much stiffer, and more technical custom-x (just as an example)).

So in order to deliver that all mountain 'do it all' ride, they brought over a lot that made the custom what it is and tried to apply it to a slightly softer flexing board. That's really the nub of reason 1.

Women's boards are comparatively softer than their male counterpart board. The reason then that you want to buy a women's snowboard rather than a man's snowboard is: 1. It's obviously more likely to 'fit' your height/weight/strength better. And 2. it takes a lot of the guesswork out of the product description when you don't have to apply it to how a woman might feel riding a man's board.

In addition to being softer longitudinally (from tip to tail) they are also softer torsionally (from edge to edge). This means the board will twist easier and get on edge with less resistance... comparatively speaking of course :)

Flex: the 2011 reprise

A brief reminder about flex: There is no universal criteria of flex. Board companies decide for themselves, (often based upon referencing their own line), what they mean by the board's 'flex'. A 5 on a Burton board may feel completely different to a 5 on a Ride board for example.

What makes this even more confusing is that different companies decide whether they are appealing to an internal single scale when talking about their own boards – so 4 is a 4 on all boards regardless of the sex of the person riding them; whilst others will base it on a flexible scale specifically referencing the intended sex of the person on the board (so a womans four will ride like a mans 2 or 3 and a mans four will ride like a womans 5 or 6).

Finally, not really related specifically to the point, but a note of caution on flex in general: First, it's NEVER to be trusted on its own. It's a ball park figure that only gives an indication on how a board MAY feel.

Anyway, that covers the first reason: Board's designed specifically for women are softer than their male counterpart ride.

Reason 2: Women ON AVERAGE have smaller feet than men:

Waist width is a silly term. Why people measure from the narrowest part of the board instead of at the central point of the inserts is anyone’s guess, but let’s not dwell on it. The pertinent fact is rather this: women have smaller feet compared to men, so women’s boards are built specifically to address this by being much narrower than their male counterparts. Pretty simple and straightforward then.

Why does this really matter then? What would it matter if you got on a board a bit too big for you? Aren't I being a little abstract here? It's one a few cm's difference, right?

Well, getting on a board that's too wide for you means you’re working a damn sight harder getting on edge than you need to be and so will be having a pretty hard time riding it. Consider this: if you are on a board with a teensy bit of boot overhang on a slightly raised platform (your bindings), the turning force required to get onto your edge is pretty small. Just a little bit of pressure and the board will move to your will. Now consider the inverse: you’re on a snowboard, your boots are a couple of centimeters shy of the edge, and you want to raise your board onto its edge. Clearly it’s going to be more difficult to achieve if only because the turning force is being applied to the wrong place (a few cm's inside the board). Throw in the stiffer torsional flex on top of it and you’re looking at a harder time to get on that edge.

The result is less fun, less control, and a more exhausting ordeal. In effect you are riding a wide board. If I just want a regular ride, a wide board isn’t remotely on my consideration list, and it probably shouldn’t be on yours either.

Technical conclusions:

Still, you might have (relative) boats for feet, you might be (relatively) big enough to justify a guy’s board, and you might have even learned everything you know from riding men’s boards. Well, truth is, this isn’t to tell you what you can and can’t ride; It’s to explain what the consequences MIGHT be should you wish to buy a guy’s board and aren't the right size for it. If you're big enough for a guys board then don't let em tell you you shouldn't be riding one. That's not really the message. The message is OVERALL most people will either be too light, or too small, or not have big enough feet to get on one.

Shay for example famously rides a lot of men’s boards, and indeed cherishes her 03-04 black snowboard of death (a men’s seriously ripping freeride board). The day I tell Shay “You’re doing it wrong!” is the day I get a deserved punch in the face. You ride what you like, and if you feel none of this applies to you, then understand that this literally means ***none of this applies to you.*** I'm just telling you what the differences are and why the differences exist in relation to your ride.

But I said there were three reasons. Well, I have one more reason left, and it’s got NOTHING to do with your ride.

Reason 3: Supply and demand



Here's a typical day in the life of me at SIA:
Me: "Why didn't you release your [insert awesome new tech] for women this year?"
Them: "We didn't think enough women would buy it until it was more well known."
Me: "Why don't you have that board in sizes for smaller or larger women?"
Them: "We sell more of the middle sizes, unusual sizes aren't cost effective. Many shops won't order them."
Me: "Why the shtook does that board have butterflies and hearts all over it?"
Them: "The average buyer is some girl's daddy, and innovative graphics don't sell well, since daddy finds them confusing."
(Kelly from shred betties on easyloungin).

I like this quote because it lays bear one of the issues touched upon above. Namely, manufacturers possibly don’t feel an economic imperative to prioritize research and design on women’s boards (or offer a comparative range of product). It is consumers and demand that dictates whether people will take more risks in development and since there appears to be a smaller demand, why take risks on creating boards that no one maybe wants?

Buying men's boards when there are alternatives out there then not only causes issues for your ride, in addition it creates a false idea of the environment allowing board manufacturers to shirk their responsibilities to women.

In my times I have yet to meet a girl who didn’t love powder just as much as the next guy. Yet where are the powder boards for women? To my knowledge there are only two companies with a female specific powder board (venture and burton). Even if there are a couple more I've missed, the sad fact is that women have significantly less choice in this regard than men. An oversight? A lack of demand? A failure of imagination? It could be any one of those things, but what is crucial is that there is a perception that there is just not enough demand out there to justify the creation of one for most company lines. It is a vicious cycle that helps keep investment hyped around offering new gadgets and gizmos instead of offering the more practical and dare I suggest equitable policy of equal lines and ranges for women as men.

So while it is understandable for someone to want the newest tech on a board that might not be available to women for a few years, it does help to perpetuate the cycle and encourage manufacturers to focus more on what new things their majority consumer base (guys) might want to see on next years deck instead of offering similar lines for female riders.

Again though, this isn’t your individual responsibility, you are just one consumer out there, so put this argument somewhere around the same area as eco-friendly snowboarding. It’s really one that appeals to your own moral compass. If you think more money should be put into making women boards then you vote with your dollars. If you couldn’t care less about it, I’m not going to tell you that you should. It’s just an open ended question that might be worth considering in your personal calculations when you hand over your cash at the end of the day.

Conclusion:
Flex:
The flex on women specific boards is often softer than their comparative men’s board.
Women’s boards are also torsionally softer. This makes them easier to get on edge as well as easier to twist about.
All changes between male and female boards are context related. Women’s boards aren’t just ‘softer’. They are softer with a clear purpose

Waist Width:
Because women have smaller feet, women’s boards are narrower than men’s boards at similar sizes.
A boards WaistWidth is a GUIDELINE and doesn't give the full picture.
2 boards with a waist width of 23.2cm can have 1 or 2cm difference at the inserts due to the sidecut.
Getting on a board that is *too* wide for you makes almost everything WAY more difficult and less fun. It is something most people would strongly advise against.

The snowboard as a (political) weapon:
Finally, supporting women specific lines encourages manufacturers to invest in supplying those and other lines.

In the end, I would love to make the statement that things have changed for the better, and i genuinely assume they have, but since I started writing this on the grounds that I know nothing about boards for women, it would be a little disingenuous to proclaim myself as some kind of knowledge on the history of female shredding.

So finally heres a few links to some places that might be able to answer your questions in ways that I definitely can't:

http://www.shredbetties.com
http://powderroom.net
http://www.ladyinshred.com/
http://www.shayboarder.com/
http://easyloungin.com/forum/forum.php?id=12
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  Quote ippollite Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/30/2011 at 1:21am
STEP 2: TYPES OF DECK

Introduction Summary:

The main board guide has 6 categories. They're pretty reasonable, but do stem more from my own assumptions than anything else. The thinking went something like this:

Type 1: Noodles: urban, jibbing, struggles outside of park. Super soft.
Type 2: Park: poppier, stable, but still super soft. Mainly park, but more versatile and built with small-medium features (jumps in particular) and cruising in mind.
Type 3: All resort: Do it all boards. Bit of everything, can hold an edge in most conditions, but don't really achieve anything specific. Great intermediate all round boards for trying things out and finding one's preferences.
Type 4: All mountain: Literally ALL mountain (resort and backcountry). These are technical freestyle boards for big hits and features. Will be solid and stable and can be taken into any terrain. Still, not freeride specific nor will they be great in conventional sense of 'park' riding.
Freeride: Directional setback slackcountry style twisty turny, lightning edge to edge perfect carves, charging boards. Will bomb any line and will rip through anything nature throws at it.
Powder:As above but with a taper. Super fast edge to edge, and can hold up on any line. But you will NEVER sink that nose in even if you go from light pow to wet crud. Its surfing it all!

I kind of stand by that as a general way of breaking the boards down, but well, theres just not enough 5's and 6's out there for women to really justify 1 let alone 2 categories. In addition, types 1-3 are pretty confusing whilst 2, 3 and 4 often overlapped.

In order to provide a clearer map, and also a larger margin of error, I've cut the categories from six to three (Park, resort, all mountain).   

Ostensibly the criteria still exists, and if you look at the table in step 3, you will see that (where necessary), I have added one of the old categories to make it a bit more distinct (you may see boards listed as jib/park or all mtn/freeride or all mtn/pow if i felt it required a little extra emphasis, hell, i even have resort/all mtn when i can't honestly tell).

So what's changed? Well, now there are THREE categories.
They are: PARK - RESORT - ALL MOUNTAIN and I'm going to try and explain a bit about them:

Type 1: The All-Round Park Deck

General Specs:
Flex:
super soft to soft-medium (very buttery to quite buttery)
Base: Extruded mainly.
Shape: True twin - almost exclusively.
Camber: Mainly reverse or zero, but some camber boards are still holding the line.
Best for: Jibs: rails and boxes; very mellow cruising; buttering the mountain and looking pro.
Worst for: Progressive riding outside the park; getting down your carving and pop; and hitting those double black diamonds or slashing pow in the slackcountry.


So this is a park board right? Well yes and no. The defining characteristic of these boards ISN'T that they are park boards, but that in the grand scheme of riding (and once you have a few years under your belt), this board will be used PRIMARILY in the park.

However, if you are a beginner, the term 'park' is not only useless, it's also rather unhelpful. These boards are soft, super forgiving, and easy as hell to learn on. For a first year wanting nothing more than hitting turns, cruising the groomers, popping a few ground spins, maybe sliding a box or two and hitting a couple of jumps, this board will not only do what every other board will do, but it's maybe going to do it better.

Park then is a misnomer to the beginner. It's also a massive misnomer in general given that these boards won't be landing 30 foot kickers, and they'll be folding up in the pipe (the park is after all a big place). These boards are built for pressing, buttering, jibbing, cruising, and all round doinking about. They aren't made for ripping all terrain, nor are they made to land massive airs. Of course, as you progress you will find that statement to be less and less true, but let's not confuse things more than they already are. :)

For Beginners: These boards are perfect for getting those first turns and really enjoying snowboarding. They are made for FUN. You may outgrow this board or consign it to a jib deck in your quiver in a year or two when you realise it's holding your progression back, then again, you might think charging blacks and trees suck. It's all personal. In the end they may hamper progression, but for greens/blues, park and those early days, no problem.

For intermediates: Great to cruise with, and perfect for anyone starting in park after neglecting it for that first year or two. Anyone used to harder charging boards may find it fun at first, but feel a little restricted by it as a go to board. It will probably end up an essential part of any quiver though and get pulled out on those days you just want a bit more of a mellow day of it or just want to show off a bit.   

For Advanced: you know what it is, you know what it's for, you know why you're looking at it. You don't really need me to egg the pudding here. This is your park ride. It's your urban ride, and its your cruising the resort or even your ripping up double diamonds just to spit in the faces of people like me that might suggest "you will struggle outside the park on a jib board!" ride. :)

A couple of recommendations with reviews to show the scope we're talking about here:

Capita Space Metal Fantasy: On the noodley side you have capita's SMF: The horrorscope for women. It comes with flatkick and a super soft jibcore which makes everything super buttery and playful. This board is ultra forgiving, maybe a hair too soft to be anything more than a jib deck, but Zoe loves it, it's also her go to ride just to spit in the face of what I wrote above about it being 'too soft to be anything more than a jib deck'
(a link to zoe's review: http://www.trusnow.com/Capita-Space-Metal-Fantasy-Womens-Snowboards.asp

Arbor Cadence: On the stiffer end of the range you have the Arbor Cadence. It comes with reverse camber (parabolic rocker, which just means rocker from the middle - with a smaller arc as you get to the tip and tail), along with grip tech (extra edge contact at the inserts) and a slight blunted shape. This board is made for some serious park shredding but also a great board for cruising. The park system puts it a little more in the park line though, but easily this board could end up your go-to shred stick:
Shay loves it and made it her park board: http://www.shayboarder.com/2010/05/snowboard-review-10-11-arbor-cadence.html

Other recommendations:
Nitro Runaway; Bataleon Distortia; Sierra Vspot; Burton feather or social; Flow Jewel; Gnu B-street; K2 Fling or vavavoom; Rome detail; smokin PYT.

Type 2: The All round RESORT deck

General Specs:
Flex:
Soft-medium - medium flex.
Shape: Twin, directional twin (and the myriad of ideas directional twin encompass).
Base: Sintered and Extruded. Basically a price point issue.
Camber: Veering towards hybrid cambers with a camber option.
Best for: Tasting it all: cruising the whole mountain, messing around in the pow and pretty much hitting up everything the resort has to offer. Also stable and forgiving, so great for progressing through those first few years. It's the one board quiver killer.
Worst for: Specializing and fitting it into your quiver when you start building it. You'll probably outgrow it when you find your preferences, and you'll find your preferences by recognising where you're outgrowing it (which is kinda one of the best things about it too) :)



Usually on the medium-soft side of things, these boards are made (almost entirely so), to be one board quiver killers. Of course they aren't and never will be, but the nice thing is that for progressing riders you likely won't realise until the time comes when you need to make that next step forward. These boards then come with a beautiful double edged sword: On the one hand they are PERFECT for letting you try out everything, (and i mean EVERYTHING) the resort has to offer. This will really let you get a handle on your preferences and help with your progression. Yet on the other hand, if you do find yourself preferring certain things over others, you'll maybe end up realising that you need to be on a board more suited to that particular function.

This isn't of course an iron law of the universe. It's just as likely that you come to love this ride and are more than happy NOT specializing because you like just riding about the mountain and enjoying your vacation snowboarding. This isn't a job and we don't all have aspirations of being the greatest rider or getting our technique the best it's ever going to be. Some people just want to enjoy being on the mountains and doing it on a board that holds it's own pretty much anywhere you want to ride it. Well this board will do that and more. And who says you can't be pro riding one of these? Not me.

From grinding boxes all day, to riding every course the mountain has to offer and maybe even mucking about under the ropes or in the trees, this board will pretty much cover it all. Sure, it's going to be harder to get a full steezy press out of it like a park board, and maybe it'll slide out a bit or nose dive in deeper pow, and maybe it won't be all that quick with its turns and bounce you around a bit in chop.

But you bought this board NOT because it gives you the BEST performance in EVERYTHING, you bought it because it gives you the best ALL ROUND performance in a single board. It's going to grind boxes and rails better than an all mountain, it's going to slash pow, hit steep lines, and charge way better than a park board. You bought it because it's the most friendly and versatile board for everything you're likely to do at a resort and that's pretty much the bottom line.

For Beginners: Another great choice for beginners. In fact the ideal choice if you ask me. These boards not only allow you to start off your riding in a nice easy forgiving manner, but it will also have the stability and edge hold to push you into that next step. These boards also come in pretty much every camber conceivable allowing you to trade off a bit of stability at speed (camber) for early doors forgiveness (reverse), or even mix and match them both in hybrid. They also come in a variety of flexes from medium-soft through to medium-stiff.

So whereas your mates who went for the soft boards will be busy getting bounced around and washing on the harder runs, you'll be holding your edge and learning to deal with the terrain. These boards offer a much longer progression curve for beginners whilst still allowing for a forgiving ride (though its all a game of trade off's :)).

For intermediates: You've done your first year or two and you want an upgrade. You're hit with questions like "what do you like doing?" and you honestly can't answer the question because you have no idea. You just kinda like snowboarding with your mates and hitting up whatever. Well say hello to your new board. :) These boards are built for you. They're soft enough to be mellow and forgiving, (but stiff enough that when you want a bit of pop it's not going to just fold out on you), they hold up in almost all terrain, they can hit up almost all of the park with no bother. More importantly they are FUN. They're the boards that let you doink about the mountain bouncing off bumps, charging up ice walls, hitting the trees, and buttering the flats. These boards are built for intermediates who either dont know or dont care what their preferences are. They just want to snowboard and want one board that lets them taste it all.     

For advanced: Obviously the main reason to get one of these is that not everyone likes the feel of stiff boards. Not everyone enjoys ripping with really aggressive rides. Not everyone is going to naturally veer towards the baddest, heaviest, nastiest, crud smashing, chop destroying, uber-stable, turn on a rail, bombing deck. Some people are a little more subtle and maybe refined in their tastes. These boards are just as likely to feature as an advanced riders go to deck as any other deck. In fact since they are all resort and FUN forgiving playful stable rides, they might even feature in MORE people's go-to collection than any other ride out there.

But for those of you who do love a bit of smashing things up on your tank board these boards give you two things to consider: 1. They make more aggressive small-medium feature park rides and 2. They make great cruising decks. they're still going to hold a line, and they're still going to pop, it might feel a bit more underwhelming than your main ride in both senses, but then your main ride probably feels a little too lively and aggressive when all you want to do is just muck about a bit and enjoy yourself.

A couple of reviews:

Rome Lofi and Lofi rockerThe rome lo-fi and the lo-fi rocker are great all round boards. Obviously the camber version is going to feel a lot more stable, and part of the reason for choosing the lo-fi is because there will be some big differences between the camber and reverse camber versions which indirectly also allows me to hype up camber as a VALID and LEGITIMATE tech in getting you to the ride you want to be on. Finally though, i put it up because people seem to pretty much love it. :)
http://blog.the-house.com/snowboarding/snowboard-demo-2011-rome-lo-fi/
http://www.snowboard-review.com/snowboard_reviews/review/lo-fi_rocker/
http://www.trusnow.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=32844&PID=991566#991566

Burton Feelgood, Burton feegood flying V and Burton Feelgood 2010 V-rocker:
Another fun experiment just to show your range of options. This years flying V is hybrid camber, has pretty much every tech that burton could jam into it and seems like a SOLID do it all board. The camber version on the other hand will have a bit more stability (due to the nature of camber) and power. However, the 2010 came with Burton's V-rocker which will make this board feel looser than either of the 2011s with some extra stability issues that the others won't really have. It's important to recognise that just a year of tech can change the feel of a ride, so if you want something that does it all but feels a bit more forgiving, you might want to look at the v-rocker 2010 model instead of the 2011. The point is that even in one line, and with one ride from one line you can tinker your experience in a myriad of ways to get just the style you want.

Heres shay's reviews of the 2010 and 2011 so you can see how she felt about those changes:
http://www.shayboarder.com/2009/12/snowboard-review-09-10-burton-feelgood-v-rocker.html
http://www.shayboarder.com/2010/05/snowboard-review-10-11-burton-feelgood-flying-v.html

Other boards to consider: Ride OMG; Ride Canvas; Bataleon Violenza (and feelbetter); Neversummer Infinity; Gnu BNice; Roxy Eminence; Roxy Olliepop; K2 Fling; K2 Luna/Lunatique; Nitro Cheryl Mass; Nitro Mystique; 2011 Burton Lipstick; Salomon Lark; Salomon Gypsy; Smokin Vixen.

[ETA: I'm real torn on some of those, for instance the OMG and the lipstick (both for opposite reasons). And i also left out some that I wasn't entirely sure if I understand the board well enough. Understand though, these are after all only general ideas to help you out for further research and ultimately categorising is STUPID and arbitary. I did make up the criteria and I did decide to group the boards based on that made up criteria! This isn't science here :)]   

Type 3: The AGGRESSIVE FREERIDE/FREESTYLE ALL MOUNTAIN + POW sticks.

General Specs:
Flex:
Stiff. Super poppy.
Base: Sintered
Shape: Directional, or directional twin
Camber: Camber and Hybrid.
Best for: Ripping, charging, bombing, dropping, launching, nuking, murdering, slashing, wasting, and killing the whole mountain. These boards are poppy, fast, aggressive and won't ride anything less than the most technical ridiculous lines just to make sure your worthy of standing on it.
Worst for: Hangover days, learning to ride, and seducing intermediates into thinking they really want the stiffest board because everyone knows that the stiffer a board is the more advanced a rider you are! (cue: bored intermediate wishing she bought the lofi rocker instead).



When you have aggressive freestyle rides sitting in the same group as powder boards it gets a little squirly trying to come up with an expression that encapsulates or sums up an inherent quality in common with all of these boards. Why I shouldn't just let the spaces, subtleties and distinctions breath a little is a fair question. I mean other than the fact they're all on the stiffer side, tend towards a directional or directional twin shape, and are packed with enough pop to launch any good rider that knows how to load it into outerspace is all by the by! Well maybe... :)

There are three boards out there though, that sum this category up for me and can help illustrate what it's all about. They are: The K2 GBpop; The Burton Fortress; and The Ride Promise. I really could add in the malolo and the venture boards, but they sit at a slightly more extreme side of things and honestly deserve their own category. (But they're not getting one :))

That I mention these three doesn't mean I personally endorse or recommend them, but rather that they each stood out as defining rides for each of the areas this category encompasses.

In the first case you have the K2 GBpop, an incredibly lively and aggressive directional twin freeride big feature destroyer. This board is BUILT for launching off every hit you might want to have a go at. No matter the conditions or the terrain, or where the hell you are on the mountain, this board will storm through it. what else can you add? This is your standard all mountain (whether hitting the resort or backcountry kickers) freestyle ripper. These are very much the stiffer brothers and sisters of the boards in the previous category.

Secondly you have the ride promise. While i was happy browsing boards it stuck out. The reason being that it's of course a nice stiff freeride board, BUT whether intentionally or otherwise, it looks like it has real potential for a powder kid starving for options out there. This year they added the lowpro which means you get rocker in the nose and flat camber in the tail. You also get a solid core freeride board on top of that that with a setback. If they only threw in a taper...

Obviously ride wanted it to be versatile and still be that aggressive all mountain ride, so if you're looking for a pure powder ripper, then maybe it's not going to be that, but if you're after an alternative to the malolo or a freeride charger with a bit more powder orientatation (and a tail that you can stomp (like my charlie slasher which (sans taper) this board sounds a bit like)), then this rig definitely fits the bill.

Finally you have the fortress. I was looking for something to add about the fortress in the bells and whistles section and struggling to find anything specific that people might be pulled in with (like say a camber profile or a sidecut gimmick), but then something magical happened, the pieces all mashed together in my head and I realised this board had absolutely EVERYTHING going in one direction. This board is an uncompromising freeride destroyer! Lightning fast, super damp, and super lightweight, this board is going to crash through anything put in front of it. This board seems to have one function and it's to tear up whatever line you want to ride. Whether its bombing the blacks on the resort or hitting 60 degree chutes this board is going to hold up on everything. It's honestly one of the boards that had my jaw on the floor.

So that's the three types of rides I wanted to cover in this section. Hopefully the three boards I mentioned give you a general idea of the other rides in this category. These boards are stiff, aggressive, and meant to really show their stuff on either bigger features in the park or completely outside the resort boundaries.

Inside the resort they may feel a little one dimensional or a bit repetitive (given that they'll pretty much nuke every groomer out there). But outside the resort boundaries or in natural terrain they really come into their own and start returning that investment.

A couple of last boards I really should mention though are the Burton Malolo and the Venture storm. Both boards sit a little in the pow category unto themselves. I've honestly been underwhelmed by the pow board options out there but at least these two are flying the flag. Sure an 8mm taper isn't massive, but it beats the crap out of no taper at all and the malolo sits on a 20mm taper which is AWESOME. Coupled with the S-rocker, you'll never sink that nose!
The reason the Venture really stands out though is that they offer a splitboard version which brings to the table something utterly unique for women. If you want nothing but back country lines and a deck that's going to give you that, you definitely want to look at either of these boards.

Anyway, to summarise:

For Beginners:Just don't do it. I'm not kidding, really stay away from these boards until you're absolutely sure you really want one to push your riding up a notch. This won't be for a couple of years at least. Until you're cruising the double blacks bored out of your mind and feeling penned in by the resort then there's nothing this ride is going to bring to you that you can't get on a softer more forgiving board out there. Nothing!

For intermediate riders: The same applies. These boards sing to you a song of freedom and waist deep fluffy fields of pow! But its the sirens call. Buy one of these before you really need one (and it's pretty likely you will know when you need one), and they'll feel pedestrian, one dimensional, boring... and on top of that, they'll probably knock you about a bit. These boards are somewhat uncompromising and really only suit the people that know they need them.

For advanced riders: Yeah these boards are meant for you. BUT WITH THE PROVISO that you actually want to do the stuff they are made for. Don't assume this is some natural step on the progression ladder. It's not. If you want to hit the backside of the mountain or get a bit more kick to your pipe riding then you probably want one of these boards, but there's nothing in the world that stops you improving your riding on any board you have. If you want to rip pow on an Infinity instead of a Lotus then that's entirely up to you. You won't stop progressing.

Your progression, (and I feel like I'm stating the blindingly obvious here), isn't related to how stiff your board is at the end of the day. So a massive note of caution to people thinking I'm building some kind of beginner, intermediate, and advanced scale and mapping it onto these three categories. You can be an advanced rider and be happy just cruising the groomers all day for all it matters. And if that's what you want to do, you probably don't need this board to do it.

Just because these boards are almost exclusively for advanced riders, it doesn't follow that they are advanced boards or that the people riding them are ipso facto advanced. All boards have a function that they specialise in. Save yourself the agro and buy the board that does what you want it to do, not the board you think you should be on because you're 'advanced'.

A final rejoinder then: If you don't find what I just wrote was blindingly obvious and labouring the point, you maybe aren't quite as advanced as you think you are :)

With apologies to shayboarder: A few reviews: (honestly, i'd love to not burden shay with propping up this guide, but she's one of the only women out there offering serious opinions on these rides and her reviews are somewhat fantastic):
Roxy Envi 2012: http://www.shayboarder.com/2011/03/snowboard-review-11-12-roxy-envi-c2-btx.html
The Neversummer Lotus: http://www.shayboarder.com/2010/03/snowboard-review-10-11-never-summer-lotus.html
Rome Blue:http://www.snowboard-review.com/snowboard_reviews/review/blue1

Other recommendations:Arbor Push; Capita Midnight; Flow Myriad; Nitro Carrara; Burton Feelgood ES; Venture Zephyr; Salomon Ivy; Palmer Liberty (I also want to throw out the Rossignol Diva Magtek but I'm honestly not 100% sure about where to put it. it sounds just a little too all round :))


Conclusion:
Beginners: Just because youre a girl doesn't mean I've changed my opinion. If you want to learn snowboarding and are looking to buy a board that will carry you throughout your progression chain (and last you a couple of years at least), you still need to be on a stable soft-medium flexing board. If however its just something fun to do in winter and you're not all that bothered, then the only harm in learning on something soft and playful is that you might have to shell out next year on a more aggressive ride when you realise you're hooked. Happens to us all :)

Intermediates: Ignore the sirens call! for there lies only damnation! Don't start looking for a technical ride before you really know you want it. Just enjoy the moment, get a taste of it all, and then the day you get sick of washing or feel your board isn't buttery enough, then start looking at boards to supplement or replace that all resort ride.    

Advanced: I aint telling you squat. You know your preferences, you know what you want to do, you probably know all the tech available so er, hhy the hell are you even reading this? Shouldn't you be WRITING this instead of me? :?

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  Quote ippollite Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/30/2011 at 1:22am
STEP 3: BOARD LIST AND CONCLUDING REMARKS

Men are from Mars, (and mars is colder, so...)

An absurd task, this one. A task that's no less absurd as it draws to its end I might add. I started this supplement off by proclaiming myself completely unfit to carry it out and I still believe it to be true. Still it's been fun and if nothing else I've learned a few things. Not the least of which is how much I can talk about a subject I'm not really qualified to talk about. :)

That being said I learned quite a bit about women's snowboarding, which I'd like to summarise in this conclusion:

On the positive side of things, women's boards are fantastic. There's no skimping on the tech that men get in their lines. There are absolutely no shortage of shapes, cambers, sidecuts, core profiles and price points out there to suit any woman looking to either get into the sport or simply take her riding up to the next level. Whatever you want to do, there's a board out there that is going to let you do it.

On the flip, are some minor issues though that need to be mentioned:

Firstly, women get a MUCH smaller field of product to choose from. A blessing and a curse you might think, but there it is. Women DO have less options available to them, PARTICULARLY in the more aggressive side of things. This may be because women don't really want those boards, or they don't sell, who am I to attribute a cause? But they do have less options and that is unfortunate, Particularly with regard powder boards.

Aside the boards mentioned in the previous section, women's powder boards right now look a lot like hybrid camber directional twins, and though decent for powder, it does smack a little bit off "will this do?" This is certainly one area I'd like to see improved upon (says ipps, with obvious delusions of being the CEO of snowboarding).

A second and bigger complaint though relates to information. Men can find PEER information on almost any well known board out there. Now we all know reviews are crap at the end of the day, but a few sources telling you about their experience is going to give you at least some idea of how something rides (or at least give you a bit of a clue on what it's for). Women have much less information out there, and this really lands at the feet of women. One of the biggest hurdles I had writing this supplement was trying to make a best guess of the information related through the product information. A google search for a review often led to maybe one or two tiny little product reviews on a retailers website, but outside of shay there was almost complete silence about the range of women's boards (other than maybe 3 or 4 boards that continually cropped up).

And speaking of manufacturers and their websites, a quick note:

YOUR WEBSITES SUCK!

I'm not joking. Seriously. Go look at them again and honestly ask yourself, are we giving enough information to someone out there looking to buy this board? The answer was always NO NO NO (except in the case of Burton and lesser in the case of Rome (sometimes)). Please stop with the obfuscation, it drives me up the wall. Also, I know you want to say your board is pretty much good at everything, but if every board you have in your line is pretty much good at everything how the hell am I supposed to choose? Oh! your jib board is a 7 for carving, rome? Is that so? So your scale is really 7-10 then?

Nitro - your videos. MAN ALIVE. I CAN READ!!! How about you ELABORATE or give a general idea on how it all functions together in the videos instead of just plastering your product descriptions of the exact same stuff i'm reading!

I could go on... So I will! :) Arbor also hugely disappointed me with their descriptions. I was mas completely underwhelmed by one of the companies I was really looking forward to promoting. Indeed almost all companies ASIDE BURTON (have I stressed this enough yet?) came up incredibly short at making the information clear, simple, and straightforward. K2 were definitely one of the absolute worst offenders though. No one gives less of a shit about the customer than K2 it seems. They don't even link their tech. They stick a single meaningless buzzword at the bottom of their product and DON'T EVEN BOTHER TO LINK IT to an explanation.

What do I expect you might ask? Well here's the bear minimum of what I expect. I expect a clear simple and straightforward breakdown of the tech. I then expect you to elaborate on it in a SIMPLE and EASY TO UNDERSTAND way that gievs a general sense of what the board is about. Finally I expect some opinions on the boards serious strengths. I would LOVE that. Any company that made sense of its technology and let me go as simple or as detailed as I liked wins the internet.

Conclusion

The situation at present is that there is a huge gap in viable and credible information out there for women compared to men. The reasons are irrelevant. The more pressing task is what to do about it? This brings me to the very final part of this supplement.

Once I explained the technical differences between men's and women's boards there isn't really much more I can do but throw out a few recommendations and get on with things. And sure that helps, but it's not enough. So in order to help address the disparity in information I did a little bit of cataloguing and collected together the information from most of the big lines out there. The following table should provide information on all the 2011 gear out there right now that you might want to get your hands on.

It tells you all the boards, their shape, their camber profile, their size range, their minimum waist width (i should have also added the maximum too), their flex (if given, although a fair few companies don't bother with a number definition any more), the MSRP (though i was going off websites for this so it may be incorrect) some bells and whistles, and finally a designation of the type of board in accordance with the descriptions I offered in Step 2. Hopefully this should give anyone thinking about buying a snowboard a really solid resource they can access and find out some similar boards out there.

In addition I've thrown this up as a google spreadsheet so that if anyone feels the info is incorrect or not detailed enough they can add to it :) Possibly more than any other part, this is what distinguishes the women's guide from the main guide. I hope people do find it relevant, informative and useful.

Anyway, thanks for reading the rambles and rants. Good luck out there and I hope you realise its all just nonsense in the end :)


https://spreadsheets3.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=taAzsftLbCylaog_kHlzQrg#gid=0
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  Quote ippollite Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/30/2011 at 1:22am
First pass done. Will probably have another look at it later on in the week or something, particularly that conclusion which i havent even proof read and probably sounds a teensy bit ranty :) Still, i think im done looking at it for the time being.

And huzzah! i avoided the dreaded combo breaker even with the site telling me to stop spamming! in your face haters! :p
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  Quote rye Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/30/2011 at 2:56am
hey oppollite, can l ask where you got the spreadsheet from? is there one for mens board also?
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  Quote ippollite Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/30/2011 at 3:01am
i made it im afraid. And there isnt one for men unless someone else does it :)
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  Quote rye Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/30/2011 at 3:40am
oh ok, then can l just ask you a simple question cuz l dont want to make a new thread about it

for the ride antic, should l downsize to 151 or stay at 154. l'm like 155lb and 151cm is for up to 150lb my concerns are as the following:

1-only the 156 board bag is cheap right now and l dont usually take off my binding
2-starting to do some park riding
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  Quote ippollite Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/30/2011 at 3:54am
its probably better if you make a thread about it dude :) Id feel a bit of an ass answering a dudes thread hijacking in a space that im trying to specifically keep for women... plus im slightly trollied and playing rift :p

Still heres an attempt at an answer:

The science is still the same - if you donwsize you lose stability, you lose pop, and in turn you gain a bit more manoeuvrability and twisty turny spinny roundy feelings as well as make the board feel a teensy bit softer. You pays your money and takes your chance :) Its a decision you need to make for yourself based on what you want to do.

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  Quote Forgot10 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/30/2011 at 7:40pm
Awesome guide. Im really trying to get my sister into snowboarding and if i can get her to try it out and she likes it then im coming back here to help her buy a board!
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  Quote LittleShooey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May/02/2011 at 6:57pm
This is pretty much amazing, it took a couple passes to get thought it but I respect your willingness to be thorough and having the tenacity to take it on. 

Wheres the five star button!?

Oh, small typo in the beginning:
And it is this: 
if my recommended size is 146-156, why shouldn’t I just get on a man’s board and double or even treble my options out there? 

Thank you!
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  Quote ippollite Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May/02/2011 at 7:17pm
thanks dude, ive been editing it on the fly today and took out a stack of tangents (though left some other ones in because a board guide without at least 40 superfluous tangents is no board guide i want to put my name to!). I assume you want me to write triple then? :) I'd like to argue, but i failed english at high school, so i'll take your word for it and not run to my default BRITISH ENGLISH!!! excuse that i give to my korean co-teachers every time they ask me a question :)
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  Quote LittleShooey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May/02/2011 at 7:24pm
The Brits have it all wrong, triple is certainly the better alternative. Wink

Failed English and still writing the longest posts on the forum!? Are we your surrogate professors now? I gotta ask, do you max out on characters or just feel the need to split it up (aside from when necessary)?
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  Quote ippollite Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May/02/2011 at 7:53pm
hehe, alas there is no maximum.I could go on for months. I actually put this guide into MSword and realised it was just shy of 10,000 words :)
And as for technique, well I throw out needless paragraphing all the time. In truth i'm a firm believer that a paragraph needs at least three solid points contained by one big point and maybe some form of run on sentence just to throw spanners in the works for the reader, but you try telling the kids that :) WALLOFTEXT!!CritsforOMGwtf!!! So i make some concessions to sanity. But only a few. If i had my way this thing would look like the unnamable by Beckett :p I'll also add a few headings just because i know they're a gigantic tangent (the subheading on flex and comparatively speaking pop to mind), but i cant find a less subtle way of crowbarring them in... whilst at the same time i dont want to leave them out because its nevertheless needs to be mentioned. In a sense then, if i could, i'd muck around with paragraphing because it really lets you know which people are too lazy to follow a sentence or simple thought... but then again if i was a true adherent to this type of grammar subversion id probably do away with all punctuation as well leaving the reader to work out the syntax luckily i did pass english at the second stepactuallynowirealiseitspacingisabitofaconcessiontoyourreaderaswell. :)

Just mucking about :p i know my writing is the biggest barrier to me communicating an idea. So i make some break ups in the text as a means of saying "are you still with me?" rather than the more conventional "is this structurally sound?" :)
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  Quote LittleShooey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May/02/2011 at 8:25pm
Speaking of walls of text...LOL

Just throw a "Free Slushies on Tuesday" mid-sentence and see what happens. 
Oh, and whatever you do, don't stop writing. Each piece is quite entertaining. 
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  Quote ippollite Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May/04/2011 at 6:47pm
if you remove the "don't" from that sentence, i hear that almost every day :)

Thanks though for the kind words :) And this is a secret bump because there's no way in hell im letting this drop off the first page. :p
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  Quote ippollite Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May/19/2011 at 12:59am
and this'll be bump 3/x :)
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  Quote STRICK-9 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May/19/2011 at 2:24am
Great summize Ipp.....if this doesn't help what does!
 
Got my daughter an Artec but wish I'd have gotten her a V-Spot......
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  Quote Sh4d0w Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May/19/2011 at 2:42am
Shameless bump here - Great summary. My brother and his girlfriend are learning how to board this coming season and want to buy. This came in very useful tonight trying to explain to them why my brother with size 13 feet and his girlfriend shouldn't use the same board.
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  Quote dougfagel Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May/19/2011 at 5:00am
Ippo, I will make this a Sticky so that you don't have to Spam Bump this great thread that you have created.

Wink
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  Quote ippollite Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May/19/2011 at 5:32pm
cheers dude, it was getting embarrassing. :)
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  Quote ddomski Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun/20/2011 at 7:18pm
Such a great thread.  Finally, a guide for women!  

I recommend the Gnu B Pro as an amazing board!!!  It's consistently the Good Wood Winner for women's boards and is filled with all the Mervyn tech.
Gnu B Pro 152 BTX w/ Union Milan bindings
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  Quote namsapalooza Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun/21/2011 at 3:56am
this is great. and turns out i bought the right board for what i want to do even without reading this :)
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  Quote koji3 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jun/21/2011 at 4:40am
Originally posted by dougfagel

Ippo, I will make this a Sticky so that you don't have to Spam Bump this great thread that you have created.

Wink
Should sticky his other guide then. 
If only Queensland had snow...
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  Quote laurenkate Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/20/2011 at 3:26am
wow can't get over how thorough this is! I'm only just starting to look at a board and this has been very helpful! big thankyou
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  Quote ippollite Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/20/2011 at 5:37am
thank you, i genuinely appreciate feedback on this thread. I hope the info helps, and remember this just covers the issues pertaining to womens boards. If you want to know a bit more about the more general tech inside a snowboard then check out the other sticky. :)

http://www.trusnow.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=40125

(its slightly longer :})
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  Quote jenni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/20/2011 at 5:40am
yeah its a great thread ippollite. based on your descriptioni or what not, l picked up the flow jewel. never got to test it out yet but l hope l like it :P
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  Quote EpicFAIL Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/20/2011 at 6:25am
This is AMAZING!!!! Clap
Thank you for putting so much time and effort into writing this.  Luckily with snowboarding, I've been using women's specific gear since the inception.  I had to find a boot that was shorter (because women's calves start out lower than mens), a women's board (I did enjoy the graphics as well as the narrower waist Wink), and women's specific clothing. 
The only issue that I've had with any of the above has been women's specific snowboarding/winter clothing is that it's made more fashionable (from what I've tried) than practical.  Although I like the look of low rise pants and short jackets, I loathe snow in between those areas.  I still haven't found a combo that I enjoy, that keeps me warm without sweating... that is comfortable without dragging the pants on the ground... being attractive and practical... I know, so much to ask.
 
I would also like to put it this way... For all those women out there that buy women's clothing for day to day life because it just looks better (better cut and fit), this is the same thing.
 
Thanks again for the post IP.  I will definitely come back to this thread whenever I decide to buy gear!!!StarStarStarStarStar
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  Quote EpicFAIL Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/21/2011 at 5:54am
Originally posted by dougfagel

Ippo, I will make this a Sticky so that you don't have to Spam Bump this great thread that you have created.

Wink
Doug, where do Sticky's get located?  I would like to be able to find this thread later.
Thanks
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  Quote ippollite Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/21/2011 at 5:53pm
you can find it exactly right here since a sticky pretty much means its stuck in one place :)

m00m
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  Quote ktown Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/21/2011 at 6:06pm
Originally posted by EpicFAIL

Originally posted by dougfagel

Ippo, I will make this a Sticky so that you don't have to Spam Bump this great thread that you have created.

Wink
Doug, where do Sticky's get located?  I would like to be able to find this thread later.
Thanks


its called book marking. all browser has it. use it
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  Quote bagelzzz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/25/2011 at 6:08am
I have ridden close to a hundred boards. 20% being women's. I have a size 10 foot so the width of the board is not effecting the boards I have ridden - if the had, I used elevators. With that being said, women's boards are narrower and have more flex. The narrowness makes it easier to control the board. More flex makes tricks easier to pull off.
With all that being said, I left reviews of female boards. This upset people and they tarted calling me homosexual and mentally challenged Plus all my reviews were spammed and now I can't earn points. I tried explaining the simple physics of the board being narrower makes it perfect for a beginner. But I was bashed and labeled a homosexual
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  Quote | | | bryman | | | Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jul/25/2011 at 7:13am
^^^^ ahhh, Bagelzzz, welcome back bud
 
-b
get bent
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  Quote bagelzzz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug/04/2011 at 3:26pm
Thanks B
I have bought about $2200 worth of gear - hence my hi points and they ban me for leaving reviews on female boards I bought from them. They should've banned me from buying female boards and bindings :).

I finally found my true love - the custom flying v with squeezebox - a late release with next years technology. I feel like I'm cheating - that's how sweet this board is. Paired up with cartels. Driver x boots and all new clothing - it's 85 degrees out and I can't wait for it to snow!!!
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  Quote bagelzzz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug/04/2011 at 3:31pm
Just double checked - it's closer to $3500. What a way to treat such a repeat customer - eh??
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  Quote panther Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug/07/2011 at 6:23pm
Originally posted by bagelzzz

Thanks B
I have bought about $2200 worth of gear - hence my hi points and they ban me for leaving reviews on female boards I bought from them. They should've banned me from buying female boards and bindings :).

I finally found my true love - the custom flying v with squeezebox - a late release with next years technology. I feel like I'm cheating - that's how sweet this board is. Paired up with cartels. Driver x boots and all new clothing - it's 85 degrees out and I can't wait for it to snow!!!

haha, imagine that!  after all the womens boards, you finally found a mens board and bindings that you like more.  
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  Quote bagelzzz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Aug/15/2011 at 3:50pm
Yes. The whole point of that was to let newby's who don't have a lot of money should try women's boards. They're cheaper (especially used ones) and easier to learn on.
I found my true love - a 158 custom flying v with squeezebox and cartels.
That's for good condition days.
For bad conditions I have my burton troop 146 and escapade bindings.
Save money on a nug and get some elevators and a tiny board. I've been riding 146 boards for ten years (as my crappy conditions board)
I'm 6"5'
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  Quote gamelessx25 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep/15/2011 at 12:04pm
Hey all, I'd welcome any suggestions for a board/binding combo for my gf. She's totaly new to the sport and would like to take it up this winter with me.

She's about 110 pounds, 5foot 3ish.

Thx
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  Quote ippollite Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Sep/17/2011 at 6:33pm
cant really help you on bindings, but have a look at section 2 (types of deck) for some ideas. I really like the LOOK (what else can i say?) of the lofi and lofi rocker. I also think the fling sounds like a nice mellow fun board, and zoe <3 the smf. Finally theres always the vspot, (but id definitely run the graphics/name past her first - it seems to er, divide opinion a bit. :)

Oh, and just checked out shay and her top pick for a nice soft easy going ride (i mean er, park) was the endevour boyfriend. Her binding pick was the k2 auto agogo. 

Of course these are just ideas for further research on YOUR part (or better yet, your gf's part :)). 


m00m
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  Quote lettuce Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/15/2011 at 12:59am
Thanks heaps, this really helped me pick a board for my girlfriend!
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  Quote AmyLynne Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/20/2011 at 2:51pm
Thanks for all the info.  I've only been boarding a couple of years and my brother's given me some advice, but this breaks everything down nicely.  Smile
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  Quote sleeepili Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Oct/26/2011 at 7:31pm
thank you very much for this guide. over the past few weeks ive been searching around for some deals on women's gear for a friend. i ended up going with the rossi temptation and rossi bindings. got a pretty good deal too, i think board and bindings together were like 230 or something like that
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  Quote ArborPow Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov/02/2011 at 12:36pm
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  Quote cruiserbear Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov/02/2011 at 12:43pm
excellent article. No mention of women's boards suitable for (club) racing??
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  Quote ippollite Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov/06/2011 at 4:30pm
as with the other one i figured if youre after an alpine board then you likely know way more than this guides going to help you with :) 

If youre all about racing and dont want an alpine board, then likely youre going to want a nice directional stiff deck with a nice quick base. Of course im basing that on no knowledge of racing at all, and just extrapolating from my own experience of shooting down a hill as fast as i can go :p

The fortress looks like its built for the kind of thing of course, but it does come with a pretty hefty price tag :)
m00m
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  Quote mommehK Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov/11/2011 at 8:51am
Holy cow what a thread!   

Not buying gear this season (first season - yay!), but this is going to come in super handy as I spend the next year trying to figure out what I want!
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  Quote TheHeatherMarie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov/29/2011 at 8:18am
Are there any women out there that can give a specific suggestion for a board for a beginner?  My husband is a snowboarding fanatic and I keep telling myself that my first time on a board (which ended in a concussion) shouldn't be my last.  I like your guide but I'd like someone to tell me--hey get *this* board. 
Thanks
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  Quote RideTimeless Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov/29/2011 at 8:23am
Originally posted by TheHeatherMarie

Are there any women out there that can give a specific suggestion for a board for a beginner?  My husband is a snowboarding fanatic and I keep telling myself that my first time on a board (which ended in a concussion) shouldn't be my last.  I like your guide but I'd like someone to tell me--hey get *this* board. 
Thanks


post this question as a new topic and we'll help you from there.  height, weight, boot size, other preference, etc.
Did you google it?
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  Quote maviles Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov/30/2011 at 7:46pm
I just came across this post and found it very helpful. Thank you.
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  Quote Angry Midget Yo Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov/30/2011 at 8:38pm
Originally posted by maviles

I just came across this post and found it very helpful. Thank you.

I didn't know this thread existed!  Just as good as Ippy's original thread.  Big smile
Sessions sucks hairy monkey balls, the end.
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