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metalheadman View Drop Down
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  Quote metalheadman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: All mountain Bindings
    Posted: Feb/24/2013 at 11:25am
I know that this question gets asked a lot, but I am wanting to get new bindings and just looking for some advice. I ride a Rossignol Angus Amptek and I have size 12 boots and right now I ride with Ride LS and I am just wondering advice on a good all mountain binding. I want to do some park riding and also hit the slopes and just carve down the mountain in the powder or ice if the slopes are icy. I am looking for some advice on some really good all mountain bindings. I am looking still in the Ride company but I will gladly look into anybody's advice for any other really good all mountain bindings I am looking to keep the price range under 200 dollars for these bindings so any extra advice on what to try would be great.
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  Quote chillman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb/24/2013 at 11:44am
Union Forces. 200$ and will last forever.
~2011 CAPiTA Indoor Survival FK~2011 Union Cyan Forces~2012 Burton Rulers~
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spenser View Drop Down
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  Quote spenser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb/24/2013 at 5:34pm
there is simply no such thing as terrain-specific bindings; it's 100% preference.  some like softer bindings, some like stiffer bindings. there are trends you can see (like softer bindings for park riding, and stiffer for mountain/freeriding), but they are nothing more than trends.  YOUR preference rules all.

if you're looking for a solid medium flex (which is the category most bindings fall into) then you will most likely be stoked on all the standards... union force or atlas, rome 390 or targa, burton cartel or malavita, so on and so forth.
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  Quote sdwc96 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb/24/2013 at 6:26pm
others have mentioned this, and i think spenser was one, but most people will recommend the gear they use and say its awesome. 

390 bosses have cant beds that you can swap to help with wider stances and setback stances for powder riding (ie have a flat bed on the back and 3.0 bed in the front).

unions have been known to have easily interchangeable parts so you can customize bases and highbacks if you want something different.

i've found most ride bindings to feel a little numb compared to rome or butron bindings. see if you can demo the standards spenser mentioned and try to work in the direction you want to go, stiffer or softer.

my brother uses flux rk30s for everything: pow, 30ft jumps, and park, even though theyre a softer binding. youll just have find something you yourself like.
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  Quote jhoang6 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb/24/2013 at 7:22pm
some of the top names I've come across are Unions, Burtons, Flux, Rome, and Ride They're all also recommended too.
The marketed "all-mountain" binders: Union Force, Burton Cartels,  Flux TT30, not too familiar with Rome and Ride just yet.. but the three mentioned around around the $200 range you're looking at..
plus its end of season so you might be able to get a discount on em..
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  Quote 2zz Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb/24/2013 at 10:45pm
Can't go wrong with Sierra's Rome S90.
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  Quote Lux Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb/27/2013 at 2:41pm
My recommendations are Burton Cartel, Flux TT30, and Union Force. All three are quite good do-everything bindings and can fit your boot size. My personal favourite is the Flux TT30. The tool-less adjustments alone are absolutely worth it. I had the 2012 model and it took a real beating and kept on going like no tomorrow. Absolutely fantastic binding for the money and easy to work with and ride all typical conditions. 


Originally posted by spenser

there is simply no such thing as terrain-specific bindings; it's 100% preference.  some like softer bindings, some like stiffer bindings. there are trends you can see (like softer bindings for park riding, and stiffer for mountain/freeriding), but they are nothing more than trends.  YOUR preference rules all.
That generic argument could be said for boots, boards, jackets, gloves, helmets, goggles, or any other piece of snowboard equipment. Terrain-specific categorisation of bindings is fair play because construction details will make a binding more suitable for specific types of riding. For instance, nobody with any common sense would suggest a noodly urethane binding for carving up groomers because you would be better off strapping yourself in with elastic bands... there is no feedback from the board and terrain. This is also why stiffer bindings are preferred by big mountain and professional pipe riders being that they feed back riding information from the snow to the boot and rider.
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  Quote RastaRider Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb/27/2013 at 2:56pm
Originally posted by Lux


Originally posted by spenser

there is simply no such thing as terrain-specific bindings; it's 100% preference.  some like softer bindings, some like stiffer bindings. there are trends you can see (like softer bindings for park riding, and stiffer for mountain/freeriding), but they are nothing more than trends.  YOUR preference rules all.
That generic argument could be said for boots, boards, jackets, gloves, helmets, goggles, or any other piece of snowboard equipment. Terrain-specific categorisation of bindings is fair play because construction details will make a binding more suitable for specific types of riding. For instance, nobody with any common sense would suggest a noodly urethane binding for carving up groomers because you would be better off strapping yourself in with elastic bands... there is no feedback from the board and terrain. This is also why stiffer bindings are preferred by big mountain and professional pipe riders being that they feed back riding information from the snow to the boot and rider.

Only boards are terrain specific. Boots, like bindings, can perform everywhere and do just as good, if that is what the rider PREFERS. Some people like stiff boots for everything, some people like soft boots for everything, some like soft boots for certain things and stiff boots for others and vice versa. Same with bindings. Boards are terrain specific because of camber type, shape, flex, setback, taper etc.

I've never seen jackets, gloves(aside from pipe), helmets or goggles be marketed as terrain specific. It just seems to be an ever growing misconception that bindings and boots are terrain specific though, and that's simply not the case
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  Quote spenser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb/27/2013 at 3:11pm
yes it's generic, but it really is all preference, as much as we want to say there are facts about what's best. there just are not facts about such things.  some dudes that rip the backcountry ride with no highbacks and soft baseplates.  some dudes that ride park are on stiffer bindings.  same with boots.  it's 100% preference, period, and "terrain specific" is mostly a marketing term aimed to sell certain products.  what I will agree on is that sometimes it can help point someone in the right direction, but it's still ultimately preference.

what you are touching on is the trends I mentioned.  yes, it tends to be that people who ride certain types of terrain will tend to fall into the same preference category, but it's still all preference.  I like to be completely subjective with things like that, because that's the most realistic way to go about it.  there is no "best" or we would all be riding the same thing.
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  Quote Lux Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb/27/2013 at 3:23pm
Originally posted by RastaRider

Originally posted by Lux


Originally posted by spenser

there is simply no such thing as terrain-specific bindings; it's 100% preference.  some like softer bindings, some like stiffer bindings. there are trends you can see (like softer bindings for park riding, and stiffer for mountain/freeriding), but they are nothing more than trends.  YOUR preference rules all.
That generic argument could be said for boots, boards, jackets, gloves, helmets, goggles, or any other piece of snowboard equipment. Terrain-specific categorisation of bindings is fair play because construction details will make a binding more suitable for specific types of riding. For instance, nobody with any common sense would suggest a noodly urethane binding for carving up groomers because you would be better off strapping yourself in with elastic bands... there is no feedback from the board and terrain. This is also why stiffer bindings are preferred by big mountain and professional pipe riders being that they feed back riding information from the snow to the boot and rider.
Only boards are terrain specific. Boots, like bindings, can perform everywhere and do just as good, if that is what the rider PREFERS. Some people like stiff boots for everything, some people like soft boots for everything, some like soft boots for certain things and stiff boots for others and vice versa. Same with bindings. Boards are terrain specific because of camber type, shape, flex, setback, taper etc.

I've never seen jackets, gloves(aside from pipe), helmets or goggles be marketed as terrain specific. It just seems to be an ever growing misconception that bindings and boots are terrain specific though, and that's simply not the case
You may be confusing personal fit and comfort with application-targeted design. You are also vague about "preference". What preference? Preference based on what? Based on performance or preference based on fit? If what you say is true and that boots and bindings are strictly a comfort preference, then where in between a $150 and $550 boot was it decided that more products were needed? If bindings were engineered by comfort preference, then there would be maybe one or two highback and strap choices and a range of sizes to fit because application-specific performance and design is ignored altogether.

I know that riders will often choose a binding (or boot or any other piece of equipment) based on their preferred riding style, quality, fit, and, to some extent, sponsorships. But that is no excuse to be ignorant of the design choices implemented by the manufacturer to make the product more suitable for specific types of riding. "Based on what the rider prefers"? That does not explain why manufacturers use higher glassing concentrations in the baseplate or the use of carbon fibre materials in the highback in stiffer models. Tapered straps and asymmetrically shaped highbacks also affect the binding's performance when the boot is stressed and flexing while strapped in. Yeah, I prefer super stiff boots, but it would take one incredible health-related alibi to justify trying to do ground tricks in a Burton SLX when my Burton Grail is on the shelf staring me in the face.

The binding is the most adjustable piece of snowboard equipment you have and there is no legitimate reason ignore the design and engineering involved in creating application-specific variations of the product.
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  Quote spenser Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Feb/27/2013 at 3:28pm
based on your reply, it does not seem to me that we are understanding each other on either end, and that's okay.  opinions are just as subjective as preference, and people are not always going to see eye to eye.
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  Quote Backside10 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar/14/2013 at 5:44pm
Cartels are pretty bullet proof and have a long track record. Hard to beat burton customer service if you ever do have a problem too....
Nitro Rook 156, Burton Cartels
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ameration View Drop Down
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  Quote ameration Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar/19/2013 at 9:05am
I've ownes/riden GNU strap-in, GNU rear-entry, Flow and Burton bindings. Like mentioned above it all comes down to what you are looking for in a binding (flex, ease of entry, etc...).

My favorite out of all the bindings that I have owned/riden are the GNU Agro bindings that I have on my Lib Tech Skunk Ape HP now. They are the rear entry style but that have a toe cap and on the fly strap adjustment, which most rear-entry bindings do not. Pretty much a combination of the strap in bindings and the rear-entry bindings put together. The GNU's run anywhere from $159+ regular price but I'm sure you can find them much better than that this time of year.
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JBburton 18 View Drop Down
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  Quote JBburton 18 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar/22/2013 at 1:10am
Originally posted by Lux

Originally posted by RastaRider

Originally posted by Lux


Originally posted by spenser

there is simply no such thing as terrain-specific bindings; it's 100% preference.  some like softer bindings, some like stiffer bindings. there are trends you can see (like softer bindings for park riding, and stiffer for mountain/freeriding), but they are nothing more than trends.  YOUR preference rules all.
That generic argument could be said for boots, boards, jackets, gloves, helmets, goggles, or any other piece of snowboard equipment. Terrain-specific categorisation of bindings is fair play because construction details will make a binding more suitable for specific types of riding. For instance, nobody with any common sense would suggest a noodly urethane binding for carving up groomers because you would be better off strapping yourself in with elastic bands... there is no feedback from the board and terrain. This is also why stiffer bindings are preferred by big mountain and professional pipe riders being that they feed back riding information from the snow to the boot and rider.
Only boards are terrain specific. Boots, like bindings, can perform everywhere and do just as good, if that is what the rider PREFERS. Some people like stiff boots for everything, some people like soft boots for everything, some like soft boots for certain things and stiff boots for others and vice versa. Same with bindings. Boards are terrain specific because of camber type, shape, flex, setback, taper etc.

I've never seen jackets, gloves(aside from pipe), helmets or goggles be marketed as terrain specific. It just seems to be an ever growing misconception that bindings and boots are terrain specific though, and that's simply not the case
You may be confusing personal fit and comfort with application-targeted design. You are also vague about "preference". What preference? Preference based on what? Based on performance or preference based on fit? If what you say is true and that boots and bindings are strictly a comfort preference, then where in between a $150 and $550 boot was it decided that more products were needed? If bindings were engineered by comfort preference, then there would be maybe one or two highback and strap choices and a range of sizes to fit because application-specific performance and design is ignored altogether.

I know that riders will often choose a binding (or boot or any other piece of equipment) based on their preferred riding style, quality, fit, and, to some extent, sponsorships. But that is no excuse to be ignorant of the design choices implemented by the manufacturer to make the product more suitable for specific types of riding. "Based on what the rider prefers"? That does not explain why manufacturers use higher glassing concentrations in the baseplate or the use of carbon fibre materials in the highback in stiffer models. Tapered straps and asymmetrically shaped highbacks also affect the binding's performance when the boot is stressed and flexing while strapped in. Yeah, I prefer super stiff boots, but it would take one incredible health-related alibi to justify trying to do ground tricks in a Burton SLX when my Burton Grail is on the shelf staring me in the face.

The binding is the most adjustable piece of snowboard equipment you have and there is no legitimate reason ignore the design and engineering involved in creating application-specific variations of the product.
 
preference is primarily based on what one "prefers" for a certain feel/fit/style etc.  list is endless.  since you and i are two different people, we will less than likely prefer the exact same things.  as said countless times on this forum, if there was a best we would ALL be using the same exact gear.  there would be no in betweens of the prices of $150-$550, but rather one company and one design.  period.  the countless options are not necessarily for little things to boost ability in terrain, but rather to provide options to fit people's comforts for what they want to do. 
 
i basically started on co2s and ions my 2nd year riding, and it was by far the best decision i ever made.  my ankles are complete shit, so the extra support gives me the comfort i need when riding.  it has been perfect regardless of what i was doing.  switched it up one year and tried experimenting with some malivitas on an x8 and it just didnt flow for anything i was trying to do.  got rid of that combo after a year.  solid equipment, but just didnt have much use for it.  as for ground tricks, ive been doing those for years with my stiffer setups.  i personally lock into a nice 360 pow butter perfectly on something relatively stiff.  just feels natural to me, and did from the beginning.  guys like nico can do butters that make you shit your pants while using shit stiffer than a boner in a whorehouse.  yet many people on the hill can't press for shit riding their "butter and rail" setups that they have for no reason other than the belief that it will make them all of a sudden better and that they can show it off to their friends.  strange huh.
 
overall, i have to disagree from personal experience that any binding/boot is terrain specific.  i have tried my fair share of shapes and sizes, but i still have a preferred feel for everything i do.  whether i fuck around on some flats, take a hiking day off to wonderland, or walk into the bar to have a few beers to sooth the bumps and bruises from the hard days work, i use one pair of bindngs and boots for everything.  that likely won't change, aside from maybe a few experimentations with new equipment in the years to come.
shredBATALEON: (4:06 PM) dude jb your being such a dutch bag man
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  Quote nifeblade Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar/22/2013 at 11:55pm
Burton Cartels/Missions (if you want a slightly more flexible binding)
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  Quote milutinho Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Mar/23/2013 at 4:38am
I don't know if anyone's mentioned it, but it's really all about preference or what you prefer...:-)

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  Quote nifeblade Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/26/2013 at 11:36pm
Burton Cartels for sure.... if they're not in your price range you can go for the Missions which are a little more flexible but are a little less response. Burtons may be a little on the pricier side but you definetly get what you pay for... their customer service is unparalled by any other company (except for maybe union)and they have a lifetime warranty on all of their baseplates. One of my baseplates cracked and they sent me new ones without me even sending the old ones back... Keep in mind there are professional riders that are sponsored by other binding companies that stil choose to use the Burton Cartels
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  Quote JBburton 18 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Apr/28/2013 at 12:09am
I love it... burton is always on the pricier side. but not really, as you are paying for the tech, costs of materials, labor, etc... you don't pay for the brand. also, I like how you come back to post the same thing as you posted before that got spammed. not trying to be a dick here, but c'mon man. as for warranty, you will get good warranty from pretty much any brand name, and most of them have the same policies. for example, you ride and hit a little rock underneath the surface and your board cracks in half, they may replace it. if you take a chainsaw to your board looking for a new one since yours has aged a bit, then they will probably laugh at you and do nothing.

as said above, there is no possible way to classify a binding as terrain specific. no way at all. the bindings are basically based on a preference of what someone is looking for as far as stiffness, support, comfort, and minor things that make the overall ride tailor toward a certain feel on the slope. same exact thing with boots. boards can be tailored for terrain due to minor differences in bends, sidecuts, nose and tail shapes, taper, flex profiles (directional vs. standard twin), setback, etc. but even then, unless you throw in an extreme variation (such as the banana hammock which no longer exists for 2014 from what I understand), you will be able to take anything anywhere and have a good time. I feel that's the best way to do it after all, as you can discover your preferences and then narrow down your options to find an exact fit for what you are looking for. what works for person "a" doesn't have to work for person "b".
shredBATALEON: (4:06 PM) dude jb your being such a dutch bag man
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  Quote JDiggidy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May/01/2013 at 9:42am
Getting played out on here, but I rode the Ride SPi bindings for a few seasons.  I can't off the top of my head reemember what re-placed them, but they are the $250ish binding from Ride.  I switched to the Union Atlas and could not be happier.  For me, the Atlas are just more comfy all around.  Not quite as stiff as the Rides were, but more responsive. 
 
Back in the day I rode the Ride EX bindings.  If you like the way they fit, you may like the Union Contacts.  They appear to be very similar in shape.
 
I've also demo'd/ridden Burton Missions and would reccomend them and their big brother the Cartels for all mountain folks as well.
2010-11 Gnu Danny Kass C2BTX, 2011-12 Union Atlas, 2012-13 Salomon Synapse & a 12-13 Thrive Renegade for kicks
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